Weighted vest

21 to 33 of 33 messages
08/01/2013 at 16:41

If shedding weight is good for running because it reduces impact on your joints, let's you move easier, lighter, with better form and probably further and faster -generally a more enjoyable and higher quality experience -why would you want to reverse that by adding weight?

08/01/2013 at 17:00

William Sichel was his name..

08/01/2013 at 17:09

William is a very impressive ultra runner. Won races up to 1000 miles, can't even envisage that sort of thing! I know he does a lot of training using a weighted vest but haven't heard of anyone else doing it.

09/01/2013 at 16:02
PhilPub wrote (see)

I'm looking forward to the study where they test the effects of wearing weighted shorts on Uranus.

Thats genuis!!!

21/01/2013 at 13:11
RICHARD WOODWARD 2 wrote (see)
I've recently starting using a 10kg vest. I run with a friend and I have the drop on him and i had forgot what is was like to work hard. With the vest I can ran at same pace but with 10 beats average higher heart rate.
So I'm happy with a hard work out and feel I'm making the most of my time.

Interesting, I've just started doing this with the other half for the same reason on our long runs as I wasn't getting the training effect I would do going at my own pace. Early indications are that it may work as I was noticably more leg tired than usual after. Only added 2kg so far.

14/08/2014 at 21:34
11/05/2015 at 22:08

All I know if I just did a modest 5 mile with a 10kg vest (I am 85kg) and that run has had a profound impact on me.  That was far more effort.  Makes sense for me in that I am a rower not a runner so want to preserve leg strength, I don't care about the speed I run plus for practical reasons I run with the family dog and since he is slightly slower than me this means I get more out of a session.  Apologies to the purists.

05/12/2015 at 20:09

A very sensible idea to try weighted vests during training to trick the body into increasing leg strength and therefore stride length. ...I am going to try it too.  They say that when you remove the weighted vest and enter a race you feel like a young gazelle!  The amount of weight does not need to be large..maybe 10-15 pounds is more than enough for runners.  After all, someone a stone(14lb) overweight would not be advised against running to lose weight...so why should it be dangerous or silly for lighter runners used to running, to carry an extra stone in training to heighten training effect?  The same vests are also used by body toners or body builders often with a lot higher weights up to 60-70 pounds. That is more for gym workouts and weight lifters than running. 

All the people who go to high altitude training are doing exactly the same sort of thing...tricking or adapting the body to less oxygen while training and then coming back with big aerobic gains.  It obviously works, or sponsors would not be spending millions of pounds sending runners to Africa for weeks and months of training at high altitude. The jokers on here sound so ignorant casting rude comments about something that can obviously work very well if done correctly.  The idea for runners is not to gain body bulk but to develop more strength in the leg muscles that propel you forwards.

06/12/2015 at 04:27

Usain Bolt and the elite sprinters of this world do plenty of strength training to build up their strength for explosive acceleration over shorter distances.

Strength training  helps improve core strength and bone density and become less prone to injury.

 

cougie    pirate
06/12/2015 at 21:23
Chris you're overlooking the extra risk of injury from the extra weight.

I run with a backpack to work - only as it's the easiest way to get kit in. I've not noticed any benefits. And also - successful runners are probably doing 50 miles per week minimum. If they added weights to themselves can you imagine the extra stress they'd have.

I've also seen people in the gym training with masks to work their lungs harder. It's all flim flam. Just run. Cheap and easy.
07/12/2015 at 01:46

Hi Cougie,

The idea is to start very slowly to increase weight by only a pound or two of body weight and to increase weight in stages up to a maximum of 10% body weight gradually, but only when you have trained to equal the pace you were running initially. You only increase weight when comfortable to do so.  That's not a vast weight. Successful UK ultra runner William Sichel has been using this technique for 30 odd years to great benefit. It specifically works muscles harder in the legs that increase push off power. I'll report at a later date whether it helped me or not! See: http://www.williamsichel.co.uk/ultra-resources/training-weight-vest/

 

07/12/2015 at 12:13

It seems like quite a bad idea, not just increasing the shock from ground contact, but the unnecessary spine compression coupled with repeated shocks.There are other forms of training which can increase strength in a targeted way which may be more useful, for those who want that.

The "well, X does it" argument isn't really terribly helpful, outliers do all sorts of strange things, that doesn't make a course of action rational over a wider population.

Edited: 07/12/2015 at 12:13
cougie    pirate
07/12/2015 at 12:22
As Kattefjaes says - there will be thousands of successful Ultra Runners who don't use weighted vests...

We'd love you to add a comment! Please login or take half a minute to register as a free member
21 to 33 of 33 messages
Previously bookmarked threads are now visible in "Followed Threads". You can also manage notifications on these threads from the "Forum Settings" section of your profile settings page to prevent being sent an email when a reply is made.
Forum Jump  

RW Forums