What weather will put you off training?

21 to 40 of 40 messages
13/11/2008 at 23:51
The only weather that stops me is the 'whether' I can be bothered to get off my arse and get out...
14/11/2008 at 03:28

I don't mean to be a pedant... but it's just the way I am.

Hyperthermia is OVERheating... "Hyperthermia, in its advanced state referred to as heat stroke or sunstroke, is an acute condition which occurs when the body produces or absorbs more body than it can dissipate"  -Taken from Wikipedia

Hypothermia is probably what you meant. Did you know that when skin is wet, heat dissipates from it 25 times faster than when it is dry? Hypothermia has been known in cases where people have been caught unprepared in sudden, icy showers. This combined with the above described wet skin effect results in a dangerously quick drop in core body temperature.

 Pneumonia however is a different kettle of fish entirely... it's viral/bacterial and is an infection rather than a "state" as the other two are. Pneumonia is an illness whereas the other two are "conditions" that simply represent a culmination of various symptoms.

Edited: 14/11/2008 at 03:28
14/11/2008 at 11:31
I must admit that if it is pi$$ing down when I get up, I do go back to bed.  I find it difficult enough to get up at 5:30 in the morning without then going out in the rain.  I don't mind if it starts to run after I have left the house though or if it is raining lightly.

I wont run if the pavements are icy now.  I slipped over and broke my wrist on ice along the Thames towpath and it was very painful and put a big hole in my running tights and a scar along the side of my knee.  Still, running with a plaster caste on was interesting!

In very hot weather, I will only run for up to an hour or as long as my water bottle lasts.
14/11/2008 at 14:29

If it's a combination of strong winds and heavy rain, i'll use the gym or go for a swim instead.

Find it uncomfortable running in anything above 20 odd degrees, so during the summer I tend to run late evenings.

 Not sure I believe what some of my family / friends say (who dont run) - that by running in cold / wet / windy conditions we are more likely to catch a chill / cold / flu, etc. Not had any of these for a long time, yet my colleagues who are mostly sedentary seem to always have a cold / virus / flu etc. Anyone else find this?

14/11/2008 at 14:35

Life's too Short - thats too funny by half.

I very rarely get colds & flu nowdays been running consistently now since 2003 and where before i'd get them 3 times a year. In recent years i'd only catch something once a year normally in Oct/Nov. so far this year nothing. Coincidently been running more this year than i have ever done

Yet others (non runners) seem to get them regularly

15/11/2008 at 02:57
I get ill a lot more frequently now than before I ran.
15/11/2008 at 13:56

it's that fine balancing act...the running increases your body's defences...but over a certain level you're battling going the other way.

However, so far so good this year... 

when i ran 25milesa  week i'd have a cold a few times a year..not really had one this year despite doing 40-50 these days...

15/11/2008 at 15:46

I go out whatever the weather although I do have to push myself a bit more to go out when it's chucking it down.

17/11/2008 at 14:25

I hate to brag, but living in Winnipeg, Canada, it's stupidly cold for months on end. Last winter, I found that I could run for about 75 mins at -35 degrees C, if it wasn't too windy. There was one occasion when I was coming home from work, and the windchill was approaching -50. That was cold like you wouldn't believe.

17/11/2008 at 16:04
I was about to boast that no weather has ever put me off - I'll even run when it's icy by running on the grass verges instead of the pavement - but ATMF has made me feel like a wuss! MINUS 50!!!!
Dubai Dave    pirate
17/11/2008 at 16:39
Try + 45C which it can often be here by 0800 in the summer!
17/11/2008 at 16:53
DD. 45!! I'll take snow and ice any day. Nothing like crisp fresh air. Although -50s probably a bit too extreme for me - now where's the treaddie. (Slinks away feeling inadequate.)
17/11/2008 at 18:12

AreThoseMyFeet - I can vouch for that. I was in Winnipeg in 1997/8 for 4 weeks over Christmas and New Year and I couldn't believe it - ludicrous. The friends I stayed with plugged their cars into heaters to stop the oil freezing (I think) and started the car with a key fob from inside the house to warm it up.

Also lived in Chicoutimi, Quebec for 6 months in 1990/1991 - not much warmer there and much more snow - I couldn't believe it. Those were my student days though so only running I did then was between pubs.

18/11/2008 at 00:07

Oh yeah, all the parking lots have rows of plug sockets for the cars, and remote starters are very popular. I don't drive though, so it's the heated bus shelters that I'm thankful for.

However, I'd take stupid minus numbers over stupid plus numbers any day of the week.

Dubai Dave    pirate
18/11/2008 at 08:07
+ 45C / - 50C that is why treadmills were invented. Even after 10 years in the Gulf I will take cold over hot, you can always put more layers on, the alternative doesn't work.
18/11/2008 at 12:12
Exactly.
18/11/2008 at 22:03
I lived in Iceland for three years and ran pretty much every day - below -16 starts to hurt your face but ski masks are wonderful things.  The only thing that really stopped you running was 'the thaw' - 4" thick ice with water running over it - impossible to stand up!   Or so I thought until I discovered Manbrottfor (not sure what they're called in English - like mini crampons for normal shoes).  But with decent clothes you can run in pretty much anything.  Although not very quickly.  Quite honestly, the weather in the UK is never bad enough to stop someone with the right clothes and mindset running
27/11/2008 at 09:13

Personally, I'd call those gadgets for running on ice ice cleats. The stretch-over types are sold in ordinary shoe-shops here in Norway. They help prevent people breaking hips in the winter. It's been minus here for a few days so I've just been getting used to my Ice Bugs again, training for a marathon next March. My other half uses ASICS Arctics. The main differences are that the Ice Bugs protrude whereas the ASICS are protected by the tread and are replaceable.

Anyway, on the original topic, I agree that wind and driving rain, or a sudden icy wet shower are the worst.

27/11/2008 at 19:44
About an hour before I was due to out for a 5 mile run, there was snow, hail and torrential downpours, so I guess that put me off slightly!!
27/11/2008 at 21:59
AreThoseMyFeet - think I'm going to print out your post and pin it above my bed for inspiration / shaming me on those extra cold mornings! -35C?!! I was whinging this morning because it was about 8C and slightly damp....

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