IM thoughts

tri novice having IM thoughts

161 to 180 of 186 messages
11/09/2012 at 20:34

EP - you can afford to build time on the bike quite quickly especially if you're only riding long once a week and will therefore have lots of recovery time. What was the longest ride you managed before the HIM that didn't leave you aching for days - 35 miles? - if so start from there and build. Using the aero bars shouldn't be an issue for an ex horse rider, it's much easier than riding in the half seat though good core strength helps.

12/09/2012 at 12:48

*taps fingers impatiently*

Well???? Have you??????

Cortina5    pirate
12/09/2012 at 14:15
The Evil Pixie wrote (see)

yep and I've felt ill ever since

what have I done?

Not told hubby yet mind!!

You wait unti you receive the briefing pack 2 months out, or you see pictures from 2012 nearer your race date.

You'll really want to puke . Oh, and the first real sight of the lake the day before....wow.....

Iron Muffin    pirate
12/09/2012 at 14:52

Well done Evil Pixie.

Have you a plan to tell hubby?

purpletrilady    pirate
12/09/2012 at 19:22

I only told mine after I entered 

Trogs    pirate
12/09/2012 at 21:07

Pix, just a thought on your neck/shoulder issue post HIM, are you fairly relaxed on the bike or hanging on for grim death? If the latter you may need just to relax a bit.

Core and upper body work wouldn't go amiss though.

13/09/2012 at 13:37
The Evil Pixie wrote (see)

book on  IM weight management! I need to lose it not gain it and I gain when marathon training due to the "have trained loads can eat" head so can't afford that!!

If it's any consolation when I did Outlaw having failed miserably to lose weight again (long story of all my adult life and a silly head I'm afraid) I was at a BMI of around 27 / 28 and the last time I had my body fat measured (in a scientific fat pod i.e. bodpod by sports sci PhD pal) it was mahoosive - I'm too embarrased to say what I'm afraid.....

And I still got round and whilst it's safe to say that the majority of others were whippets, there were some others who like me are somewhat more generously proportioned

I guess what I'm trying to say is that yes it's much easier to do if you are carrying less flab around but don't fixate on it to the be all and end all

Iron Muffin    pirate
21/09/2012 at 19:54

+1 with Podds. I lost weight training for Outlaw (1 1/2 stone) and not as much as I had thought  Plodded round still a good couple of stones overweight.

EP how is it going? I haven't been keeping up very well and apologies for not reading back, what have you entered?

22/09/2012 at 17:28

You can increase the bike by much more than that - no impact issues like running so not the same limitations.

Not a lot of point getting on the turbo for that length of time - warm ups are usually ten minutes! Of course you'll be fine to do it in your trainers but there's probably more value in using your cycling shoes and having your trainers next to you to change into - more efficient peddling stroke, getting used to unclipping without the danger of falling off and practising a mini transition.

purpletrilady    pirate
22/09/2012 at 17:35

also be careful with Fink's just survive plan. Its very low on cycling time. I think he makes a big assumption about the average speed of cyclists doing the plan.

I did 2 100 miles bike rides before my first IM, the first took over 8.5 hrs. I think fink's max bike ride is about 5 hrs?

 

 

 

23/09/2012 at 11:38

Traditional wisdom would have you increasing distance now and speed nearer the time but realistically how long are you going to spend out on the bike as it gets colder and wetter? Coffee and cake stops want to be the exception in a long ride rather than the rule.

FWIW - time in saddle (and keep the effort up - use a HRM if you have one) as long as the weather is ok for you to get outside. TTFU and JFDI on the turbo. If it's set up right there is no reason for you to fall off and if you do it will be a slow speed comedy fall and unlikely to do damage. You can make a lot of gains over the winter doing some quality turbo sessions and if you can find the mental toughness there is no reason not to get long rides in on it when the weather is awful.

purpletrilady    pirate
23/09/2012 at 11:52
Little M.iss Happy wrote (see)

Traditional wisdom would have you increasing distance now and speed nearer the time but realistically how long are you going to spend out on the bike as it gets colder and wetter? Coffee and cake stops want to be the exception in a long ride rather than the rule.

FWIW - time in saddle (and keep the effort up - use a HRM if you have one) as long as the weather is ok for you to get outside. TTFU and JFDI on the turbo. If it's set up right there is no reason for you to fall off and if you do it will be a slow speed comedy fall and unlikely to do damage. You can make a lot of gains over the winter doing some quality turbo sessions and if you can find the mental toughness there is no reason not to get long rides in on it when the weather is awful.

wise words 

Your turbo needs to be your friend on the winter months. I would fous on short quality sessions for now. You have plenty of time to build up the distance.

The year I did my first IM, I remember riding 42 miles in February and that was my longest ride ever. That year my IM was beginning of August and building up the distance wasn't difficult.

Mr StOat    pirate
23/09/2012 at 15:13

There's also nothing stopping you mixing the Fink plans, you could do 'just get round' base and then 'intermediate' peak, or JGR swim/run and Int bike, to make sure you get the hours in

Cortina5    pirate
23/09/2012 at 16:09

A few people in the same boat have used VLM as training. Of course, you could defer VLM for a year.

purpletrilady    pirate
23/09/2012 at 16:33

lots of people have done both, it really depends on your base and your background.

personally I would defer, it will take time away from your cycling and also destroys your legs for at least two weeks.

 

24/09/2012 at 07:39

Just goes to show what you can do when you put your mind to it! Smell of burning is usual if you're using your normal tyre and are in a confined space.

24/09/2012 at 20:27

I would ignore the smell, in fact I think you pretty much stop noticing it after a while - assuming it is just the rubber on your tyre. Don't forget to release the fly wheel when you've finished so that the warm, soft rubber isn't compressed into a flat spot on your tyre.

A good play list is a must for turbo sessions. Are you using a HRM?

25/09/2012 at 07:09

I find the HRM is the only way to keep myself honest, it's easy to feel as if you're working hard but a quick check shows that the HR is only in Z1.

purpletrilady    pirate
25/09/2012 at 21:48

get well soon

26/09/2012 at 07:09

Hope you feel better soon.

Small wheels or small (as in narrow) tyres? I'm guessing the latter which just means that you have say a 23mm tyre on instead of a 25mm. If a small wheel this would mean a 650 rather than a 700 - but unlikely. Warning here - I actually know very little about bikes.

Turbo tyre is a standard width, you replace your tyre with them but they are stiff and difficult to fit - my LBS did mine - and you have to put your road tyre back on to go outside.

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