Numpty IM Bike Thread

Bike ponces only welcome if they don't speak in tongues

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Cortina5    pirate
25/10/2012 at 18:12

If you plan on riding through the winter then mudguards are a godsend (other deities are available). Long rides with wet shorts are not fun. Guards can also protect the bike from road crap.

26/10/2012 at 10:09

ST - don't overanalyze your bike position at this stage - just get a bike and get riding.  you'll get more benefit from that than worrying if your elbow and knee angles are right for running off the bike.   aerobars are good as they do bring time improvements but then do so many other things like deep rim wheels, being slim and light, having a cock helmet etc.

get the engine working and trained to be comfortable on a bike over a long distance before worrying about the cockpit position

and guards can be helpful as Cat5 says - but not absolutley essential (unless pack riding).  I rode all last winter without - but then I didn't often go out when it was shitty and stuck to the turbo or MTB

TheEngineer    pirate
26/10/2012 at 13:15
fat buddha wrote (see)

ST - don't overanalyze your bike position at this stage - just get a bike and get riding.  you'll get more benefit from that than worrying if your elbow and knee angles are right for running off the bike.   aerobars are good as they do bring time improvements but then do so many other things like deep rim wheels, being slim and light, having a cock helmet etc.

get the engine working and trained to be comfortable on a bike over a long distance before worrying about the cockpit position

and guards can be helpful as Cat5 says - but not absolutley essential (unless pack riding).  I rode all last winter without - but then I didn't often go out when it was shitty and stuck to the turbo or MTB

I've got a cock and a helmet... does that make me fast?

26/10/2012 at 13:40

nope - it makes you a cock with a helmet  

26/10/2012 at 19:17

Hello - think this might be a good place for me to post as I'm a cycling newbie - I do a lot of running but really fancy triathlon. I do a lot of gym cycling, it was suggested by my physio for some issues I had with my running but apart from trailing around following my daughter on a cheap mountain bike I have barely done any real cycling at all.

Got a road bike fitted by our local bike shop, I'm tall for a girl so have a men's Specialized Allez Sport which is really comfortable, having never ridden a road bike before I was certainly expecting it to feel weirder than it did. Only problem is I have tiny hands, and damage to the tendons in my right hand, so the stretch to use the brakes when my hands are in the top position is difficult. I've had a quick search around and seen various suggestions for different brake levers and adjusting lever but wondered if anyone here had had the same issue and what you had done.

Local bike shop wants me to bring the bike in for a service in a few weeks and so I can have a chat to them but thought I'd try and do a bit of research first as well.

Thanks

Rachel

26/10/2012 at 22:45

Rachel - get some shims for the brake levers - the shop should be able to advise - they are only bits of plastic so shouldn't cost much.   My 10 year old twins both use Shimano shifters OK and however small your hands are I'll bet they are not smaller than theirs.   If that doesn't work then some bars may bring the levers closer than others - I'm not sure if bars meant for small people would also bring the levers closer or just reduce the reach though.    

Pretty sure Shimano do actually make some shifters for small hands but shimano shifters are very expensive so unless money is no object go for the shims.    

ps - the shims are proper shimano made things not just some bodge job.

 

edit - like these http://www.hargrovescycles.co.uk/products.asp?partno=30079

Edited: 26/10/2012 at 22:47
Cortina5    pirate
11/11/2012 at 16:20

Rear shifting was lumpy the other week, so I put the bike in the garage and hoped the elves would fix it. Turned out they didn't.

32 mi round trip today with horrendous gear changes, to run XC. Have just been to fettle the bike and the rear cable took a lot of tightening, then broke.

Lucky it happened at home, unlucky it happened in the shifter. I think I managed to fish out all the offending strands of steel.

Iron Muffin    pirate
13/12/2012 at 11:20

Any advice please for winter tyres for my road bike?

I ahve some lush schwalbe ones on at the minute and think I need to get something more suitable.

 

 

 

 

Mr StOat    pirate
13/12/2012 at 11:34
Continental GP 4 season
13/12/2012 at 11:56

or Conti Gatorskins

the GP 4's are more of a winter racing tyre (and hence pricier); the Gatorskins are more of an all round training tyre.  both will do a good job

Schwalbe Durano gets some good reviews

 

Cortina5    pirate
13/12/2012 at 20:55
Durano plus for the winter here.
OrangeCannon kona-4    pirate
13/12/2012 at 23:52
+2 for conti gatorskins
I use them all year now and only flip them to michelin race pro 3s or something as suggested by FB on my tri bike in race week.
Edited: 13/12/2012 at 23:53
14/12/2012 at 08:24

Has anyone had any experience with the pumps that are CO2 inflators and pumps in one device? Are these any good or am I better off getting a separate pump and CO2 unit?

Cheers

Iron Muffin    pirate
14/12/2012 at 09:49

Can I get colour matching stipes on the Duranos?

14/12/2012 at 10:55

to match what? eyes?  hair colour??  

and - no stripes - but they do come in cream, brown or green as well as black

Iron Muffin    pirate
17/12/2012 at 16:46

To match my bike and make it go faster

Thanks for the advice. I have held off on a purchase just in case they arrive in my crimbo stocking. It would not surprise me if Mr Muffin (slower) buys me some that he really wants for himself.

18/12/2012 at 12:37

I've been looking at the Felt DA4 bike as a Christmas treat for me ...   However, while I was in the bike shop there was a Felt DA1 bike reduced to half price, the owner of the bike shop had used it for Ironman UK and then that was it. The size is ok but the issue was with the electric gears, I have heard mixed reports about these.  Please can you advise? 

Thanks

 

18/12/2012 at 13:19

electronic gear sets are becoming more commonplace as their reliability improves and current ones from Shimano and Campag - and soon to be SRAM - are fine.  they're used extensively by pro riders and teams.

obviously you need to make sure you keep the battery pack charged - no point finding that 50miles from home and you don't have any gears - but other than that, they're fine.

all gearing systems will have problems from time to time - it's knowing what to do when it does happen that's perhaps the key.  

18/12/2012 at 13:22

Thanks FB, I appreciate your advice - less biased and more open than I'll get at any shop.

18/12/2012 at 13:29

we managed for a very long time with manual gears and no doubt many will continue to shun electronic.  but they have come on enormously in recent years and those who have switched will tell you that they're much easier to use and are more precise with each change.  but you still need to look after them to get the best performance.

I'm lusting after a Campag Super Record EPS set but frankly can't justify the expense - yet!

the entry price is coming down all the time - in about 10 years, most new bikes will be equipped with them I reckon.

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