Numpty IM Bike Thread

Bike ponces only welcome if they don't speak in tongues

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TheEngineer    pirate
10/10/2012 at 09:37
IronCat5 in the Hat wrote (see)
My road bike came with similar gearing on a 7 speed block. Only the frame is left now from the £65 ebay purchase.


Did everything else break?

Scuba Trooper    pirate
25/10/2012 at 09:41

Thought I'd bring back this old thread rather than starting new one.

So I've entered Challange Henley and I don't have a bike. I've been to a couple of local bike shops and am now a little confusion. One shop put me on a trek 2.1 60cm frame another 58cm Specalized allez and the other M/L Giant Defy (but thought maybe a L might be ok too). I'm 185cm tall, inside leg 89cm and 182cm finger tip to finger tip. Are the sizes significantly different for different brands? Given the amount of adjustment on seat hight and postion and adjustments to stem and handle bars could 2 fitters offer 2 different sizes but achive the same postion/fit?

Once I understand which frame size I need my plan was to buy second hand at a defy 2 type price point I should be able to save £250-300 of which I then spend £100 to get a proper fitting. Does this make sense?

25/10/2012 at 10:10

185cm is what, 6'1 ?    You are probably looking at an effective top tube length of maybe 57cm or a touch more - your proportions, flexibility, personal preferences will all play a part.      

Yes you can achieve effectively the same fit on different sized bikes - the contact points are bars, saddle, pedals and while the pedals are fixed (crank length apart) bars and saddle have scope for adjustment.   I don't see the point in going round bike shops to get an idea of the right size bike - you have probably got as accurate an estimate of the size you need off me as you'll get in your average bike shop.   

I've never bothered paying for a bike fit and certainly for a road bike I don't see the need - but if you are going to shell out £100 then do that before you buy the bike and it might save you money having to buy a new stem, seatpost etc to make a wrong sized bike fit.   Also some bikes may just not have a good geometry for you whatever you do to them.  Giant Defys have a fairly tall front end but not too excessive - so long as you don't want to go super low and aren't looking to fit tri bars in the future I'd have thought the large with maybe a 10-11cm stem is more likely than the M/L but as I say impossible to be sure without seeing you on it.

25/10/2012 at 10:13

differnt brands will have slightly different sizing methods depending on the bike's geometries.  so a 60cm in one could mean a 58cm in another or a M/L in another - and at the end of the day, they're all approximate.  unless you have a custom made frame that's built to your dimensions, it has to be a compromise.  it does sound as if the bikes shops are offering you roughly similar frames for your build so fear not!

by playing around with things like stem length, saddle position, crank lengths, seatpost height, headset spacers you can get a fit that will be almost like a custom build. and your personal riding style will also vary those setups.  a bike fitting will be worth paying for to get the set up tuned once you've bought the bike and done some riding on it to give the fitter some feedback.

and it's worth getting the right fit as a bad fit will just cause problems.

so your last paragraph makes definite sense

 

Scuba Trooper    pirate
25/10/2012 at 13:11

Fat Buddha - Thanks for the feed back, I feel a bit more confident now to go and buy something. Everyone says fit is everything but as I haven't ridden a bike for than 10 miles in one go before I'm not sure how it should feel.

Is it right that having aerobars and a position better suited to running after the ride that you should go for the slightly smaller frame if you are in between 2 sizes?

Also are mud gaurds worth lifting for training? Do you get enough spray to warrant them?

IronCat5    pirate
25/10/2012 at 18:12

If you plan on riding through the winter then mudguards are a godsend (other deities are available). Long rides with wet shorts are not fun. Guards can also protect the bike from road crap.

26/10/2012 at 10:09

ST - don't overanalyze your bike position at this stage - just get a bike and get riding.  you'll get more benefit from that than worrying if your elbow and knee angles are right for running off the bike.   aerobars are good as they do bring time improvements but then do so many other things like deep rim wheels, being slim and light, having a cock helmet etc.

get the engine working and trained to be comfortable on a bike over a long distance before worrying about the cockpit position

and guards can be helpful as Cat5 says - but not absolutley essential (unless pack riding).  I rode all last winter without - but then I didn't often go out when it was shitty and stuck to the turbo or MTB

TheEngineer    pirate
26/10/2012 at 13:15
fat buddha wrote (see)

ST - don't overanalyze your bike position at this stage - just get a bike and get riding.  you'll get more benefit from that than worrying if your elbow and knee angles are right for running off the bike.   aerobars are good as they do bring time improvements but then do so many other things like deep rim wheels, being slim and light, having a cock helmet etc.

get the engine working and trained to be comfortable on a bike over a long distance before worrying about the cockpit position

and guards can be helpful as Cat5 says - but not absolutley essential (unless pack riding).  I rode all last winter without - but then I didn't often go out when it was shitty and stuck to the turbo or MTB

I've got a cock and a helmet... does that make me fast?

26/10/2012 at 13:40

nope - it makes you a cock with a helmet  

26/10/2012 at 19:17

Hello - think this might be a good place for me to post as I'm a cycling newbie - I do a lot of running but really fancy triathlon. I do a lot of gym cycling, it was suggested by my physio for some issues I had with my running but apart from trailing around following my daughter on a cheap mountain bike I have barely done any real cycling at all.

Got a road bike fitted by our local bike shop, I'm tall for a girl so have a men's Specialized Allez Sport which is really comfortable, having never ridden a road bike before I was certainly expecting it to feel weirder than it did. Only problem is I have tiny hands, and damage to the tendons in my right hand, so the stretch to use the brakes when my hands are in the top position is difficult. I've had a quick search around and seen various suggestions for different brake levers and adjusting lever but wondered if anyone here had had the same issue and what you had done.

Local bike shop wants me to bring the bike in for a service in a few weeks and so I can have a chat to them but thought I'd try and do a bit of research first as well.

Thanks

Rachel

26/10/2012 at 22:45

Rachel - get some shims for the brake levers - the shop should be able to advise - they are only bits of plastic so shouldn't cost much.   My 10 year old twins both use Shimano shifters OK and however small your hands are I'll bet they are not smaller than theirs.   If that doesn't work then some bars may bring the levers closer than others - I'm not sure if bars meant for small people would also bring the levers closer or just reduce the reach though.    

Pretty sure Shimano do actually make some shifters for small hands but shimano shifters are very expensive so unless money is no object go for the shims.    

ps - the shims are proper shimano made things not just some bodge job.

 

edit - like these http://www.hargrovescycles.co.uk/products.asp?partno=30079

Edited: 26/10/2012 at 22:47
IronCat5    pirate
11/11/2012 at 16:20

Rear shifting was lumpy the other week, so I put the bike in the garage and hoped the elves would fix it. Turned out they didn't.

32 mi round trip today with horrendous gear changes, to run XC. Have just been to fettle the bike and the rear cable took a lot of tightening, then broke.

Lucky it happened at home, unlucky it happened in the shifter. I think I managed to fish out all the offending strands of steel.

Iron Muffin    pirate
13/12/2012 at 11:20

Any advice please for winter tyres for my road bike?

I ahve some lush schwalbe ones on at the minute and think I need to get something more suitable.

 

 

 

 

Mr StOat    pirate
13/12/2012 at 11:34
Continental GP 4 season
13/12/2012 at 11:56

or Conti Gatorskins

the GP 4's are more of a winter racing tyre (and hence pricier); the Gatorskins are more of an all round training tyre.  both will do a good job

Schwalbe Durano gets some good reviews

 

IronCat5    pirate
13/12/2012 at 20:55
Durano plus for the winter here.
OrangeCannon kona-6    pirate
13/12/2012 at 23:52
+2 for conti gatorskins
I use them all year now and only flip them to michelin race pro 3s or something as suggested by FB on my tri bike in race week.
Edited: 13/12/2012 at 23:53
14/12/2012 at 08:24

Has anyone had any experience with the pumps that are CO2 inflators and pumps in one device? Are these any good or am I better off getting a separate pump and CO2 unit?

Cheers

Iron Muffin    pirate
14/12/2012 at 09:49

Can I get colour matching stipes on the Duranos?

14/12/2012 at 10:55

to match what? eyes?  hair colour??  

and - no stripes - but they do come in cream, brown or green as well as black

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