Numpty IM Bike Thread

Bike ponces only welcome if they don't speak in tongues

11,781 to 11,800 of 11,977 messages
29/08/2013 at 11:55

"I'd go no narrower than 25mm tyres or so."

I ride 23s.... 

Cheerful Dave    pirate
29/08/2013 at 12:07

Who'd have thought that 'Specialized' and 'Giant' would be good with out of the ordinary, larger sizes?

cougie    pirate
29/08/2013 at 12:21
So do I FB !

LOL - v good = Giant and Specialized indeed. Well spotted.
Edited: 29/08/2013 at 12:22
PSC    pirate
30/08/2013 at 07:09

another, probably, daft question...

I've got a decent set of wheels (Reynolds Attack) on my TT bike with an ultegra cassette on the back wheel.  The TT bike isn't seeing much/any action this year so I want to use the wheels on my roadie which has a SRAM drivetrain.  Presumably I need to put a new thingie on the back wheel to convert it from Shimano to SRAM so that a SRAM cassette will sit properly on the wheel.

Assuming that conversion is required (or can I just swap cassettes)... is this a job for a mechanically competent bike numpty?  Or do I need to risk the LBS?  And if it's DIY do I need any special tools other than the whip and cassette removal tool which I already have?

Cheers guys n girls.

30/08/2013 at 07:22

Shimano and SRAM are interchangeable so you can just put the wheels straight on to the road bike 

PSC    pirate
30/08/2013 at 07:27

Oh fab... someone told me that they are not a perfect match and that could cause accelarated wear and tear between the two brands... is that not the case?

30/08/2013 at 08:00

Popsider - Just a straight swap on my cassette. No indexing needed and have also beeen lent proper brake pads for the zipps

Can't wait to try them out this weekend

JD.    pirate
30/08/2013 at 08:10

cougie/fb - thanks re "giant" advice!  sounds like it isn't necessary to go for a cyclocross bike then.  he definitely won't be going for an ultralight bike as he's only looking for a cheap secondhand bike.  going to take a while for a 64 to come up on ebay though i expect.

JD.
Rafiki    pirate
30/08/2013 at 08:45

I was in 'that' shop yesterday looking at an entry level Boardman MTB for winter training, when the highly skilled and efficient shop assistant told me the size I wanted wasn't available, but Boardman are releasing a new range next month - the Boardman MTB 650B's - which I can only assume means they're switching to 650 wheels - despite Boardman always saying otherwise (the highly skilled and efficient shop assistant didn't know what any of that meant!).

Has anyone else heard anything about this, and am I right in thinking this may be a better option for an all-round winter trainer? 

Cortina5    pirate
30/08/2013 at 08:49
PSC wrote (see)

Oh fab... someone told me that they are not a perfect match and that could cause accelarated wear and tear between the two brands... is that not the case?

Is it 10 speed? If so then the Shimano cassette will have a very thin spacer behind the cassette. SRAM 10spd cassettes don't need this spacer as they're a smidge wider.
I chop and change between wheels and SRAM/Simano cassettes. My turbo wheel needs a small re-index but the road wheels are all plug and play.

SS - we need pics!

30/08/2013 at 08:50
PSC wrote (see)

Oh fab... someone told me that they are not a perfect match and that could cause accelarated wear and tear between the two brands... is that not the case?

No problems at all. You'll get more wear problems by using a new cassette and old chain as they tend to wear together. So if the Ultegra cassette is pretty new/not used much it may be worth while to pop a new chain on when you swap them over. It isn't 'necessary' though. 

30/08/2013 at 10:45
Rafiki wrote (see)

I was in 'that' shop yesterday looking at an entry level Boardman MTB for winter training, when the highly skilled and efficient shop assistant told me the size I wanted wasn't available, but Boardman are releasing a new range next month - the Boardman MTB 650B's - which I can only assume means they're switching to 650 wheels - despite Boardman always saying otherwise (the highly skilled and efficient shop assistant didn't know what any of that meant!).

Has anyone else heard anything about this, and am I right in thinking this may be a better option for an all-round winter trainer? 

Raf - there are a number of brands jumping on the 650b MTB bandwagon - I think most of Trek's 2014 offerings are 650s as well.   it's probably their way of selling yet another type of MTB - they've done 26" and 29", so now they're going in-between with 650s (approx 27.2" I think).

they seem to think a 650 will offer a rider a balance between a standard 26er (which has been around for a very long time now and is still fine), and a 29er (which some riders rate highly on more open tracks as the longer wheelbase makes a smoother - maybe faster - ride).

in reality - probably not a huge difference. both my MTBs are 26ers and I'm happy with them.   will a 650 make a better all round winter MTB??  depends what you compare it with!  it will probably be good enough for the vast majority of buyers - only the true MTB officianados will argue if it's better than a 26 or 29 based on using all 3.

if the deal's good - go for it is my answer!

in some ways, it's a similar question to which is better - no-sus, hardtail or full- sus - in reality, they all offer a rider something different and have different uses but there's no reason why all 3 can't do the same trails!  

Edited: 30/08/2013 at 10:47
PSC    pirate
30/08/2013 at 21:39

cool.. cheers guys (re SRAM/Shimano)... will give it a go tomorrow unless its piddling down in which case I will to the pub!

31/08/2013 at 08:26
IronCat5 in the Hat wrote (see)

      SS - we need pics!

I have absolutely no idea how to put a picture up

31/08/2013 at 22:03

This winter I want to learn how to maintain my bike. I want to learn how to look after the chain, gears, brakes, how to disassemble it for travel and more importantly how to reassemble it afterwards .

Can anyone recommend any resources to learn from? Books, dvds, websites or youtube vids? Thanks.

PSC    pirate
31/08/2013 at 22:17

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/ is great site.

haynes do a bike manual but it's fairly basic. 

The best resource I know of is the "numpty bike" thread on RW!  

31/08/2013 at 23:17

There is loads on the internet, forums, youtube etc, the Park Tool website used to have good advice on it and probably still does Too.

Cortina5    pirate
01/10/2013 at 12:50

I have the option to swap my PX  60mm carbon clinchers (tubes, tyres) for an 82/101mm set of PX carbon wheels + tubs.

Thoughts...

 

Cheerful Dave    pirate
01/10/2013 at 15:02

Try-to-athlon, there's a useful manual on the Flo Wheels website:

http://www.flocycling.com/buildabike.php

Cat, if it's solely for race day then the deeper wheels will be a bit quicker, but it's unlikely to be a huge amount, especially over the shorter distances you're racing over these days.  Tubs can be a bit of a faff if you're not used to them and if you're going to be doing a lot of training rides on them I'd personally stick with the 60s.

I've got an old set of 82/101 PX you're welcome to borrow if you want to try them out without getting rid of the 60s.

Cortina5    pirate
01/10/2013 at 17:45

I've done a few TTs this year too, so would use them for that.

I still have a fear of tubs and DNFs (having never had this problem)! The 60s tend to stay on the bike 24/7 unless on the turbo.

I did use a pair of 82/101 on a flat twisty non-windy course and can't say they made much difference.

I may investigate faster tubes/tyres and a disc-cover instead.

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