Recenyly getting nervous riding the bike

1 to 20 of 39 messages
27/05/2013 at 21:02

recently i have been getting nervous riding my bike down hills. does anybody have the same problem as me and can anybody help ?

Nurse Ratched    pirate
27/05/2013 at 21:19

I don't like going down hills either. I'm always on the brakes, but that doesn't bother me too much because it's what makes me feel in control and therefore safe. 

One day I may learn to let go, but for now I'd rather just get to the bottom in one piece!

Dustboy    pirate
27/05/2013 at 21:56

Yes, frightens the crap out of me unless I can see where I am going, know that I can stop and that the road is bone dry.

Give me 20% up anytime over 10% down.

27/05/2013 at 22:11

Or if there is a handy hedge on a tight down hill corner Dustboy. 

 

K9
27/05/2013 at 22:19

Me too!!

Im far more likely to be caught walking down a hill than up one!!

K9
27/05/2013 at 22:19

Learning to ski seemed to help!

Doner Kebab    pirate
27/05/2013 at 22:34

i shat it a bit when i hit 40 odd mph and got a bit of a speed wobble and for about the next 3 or 4 rides i didnt go over 30 but i think i must have just forgot about it because it didnt have lasting impact. i say i forgot about it but now i remember - tnx button :/

my next ride will top out at 25

 

Slagiatt    pirate
27/05/2013 at 22:38

It's because you let me fix your bike button... You are worried something might fall off. 

In all seriousness though.. May be in part as we discussed earlier , that the frames a bit on the big side really , and you migh be happier on a better fitting bike ?

 

27/05/2013 at 23:17

Yup! I went on a new route last week and realised there was a steep down in it. I survived and the 2 experienced looking cyclists behind me didnt catch up. BUT: such a blooming wreck at the bottom I couldn't eat my jam sandwich!  

 

My plan is 2 fold: 

Join a club - used to train with a ckub in a hilly part if the country. Really boosts my confidence being talked through hills by an old hand. And knowing you arent alone! 

 

Cycle lots of hills but suitably reward myself ie next week Im going back to that hill l. I will have a quick breather at the bottom as a reward - I think familiarity will build confidence!

27/05/2013 at 23:28

It's all relative - i got a strava kom on a popular local descent the other day but there are still plenty of people I know who would leave me beind on a really steep one.

like anytthing you will improve with proper focussed practice - not just descending but trying to do so with good technique.    There are a few articles on the internet - the one  you often see linked is on red kite prayer which will probably come up on Google.   The basics are descend on the drops, relax, wide in to the corner and close to the apex, don't drag the brakes, brake before turning in, look through the corner not at the front wheel.   

28/05/2013 at 04:19

and flex your elbows a little so your arms aren't rock solid...

28/05/2013 at 06:44

Best bit about going up the freaking big hills is whacking it into a high gear and beating feet until you cant turn the pedals anymore on the other side

Altho to be fair weather  and road conditions come into play for me - gotta be sensible but I do like seeing how fast I can go - 40 mph has been my best to date - don't know that I would be keen to do more than that tho' gets a bit hairy when you have to anticipate what other peeps on the road are going to do!

Edited: 28/05/2013 at 06:46
cougie    pirate
28/05/2013 at 10:30
YouTube cancellaras descents and watch him. Amazing.

Speed isnt a problem. It's just inappropriate speed. So too fast into a corner etc. brakes these days are very good. If they can't stop you then there's something wrong with them.
28/05/2013 at 10:31

I was about to say what Pops has already said.  Have you actually been taught how to descend?  The only additions to Pops' comments I would add would be to have the inside leg up, outside leg down.  Then distribute your weight onto the outer foot and the inner hand.  Coupled with being on the drops this will give you greater control of the bike.  Also, completely agree with Pops - look where you want to go.

 

TheEngineer    pirate
28/05/2013 at 10:34

Top speed for me of 54mph (and that was on a sketchy bit of road in Mallorca) but I'm sure FB will be along shortly

Echo the advice above - the more you relax the smaller your turning circle. Of course the flipside is a positive feedback loop so if you think you're going to fast, you'll tense up and you will be going too fast. So brake early and once you turn in, you've committed to that speed. Get off the brakes and trust that your line is good. 

Edited: 28/05/2013 at 12:06
28/05/2013 at 10:53

I think that you are right to be scared going down hill; there are not many people who stay with me downhill. The reason I am still alive is that I am very selective about when and where. How do you do it? Watch this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSSEkhwVap8

It attempts to explain the 'limit point'; the furthest point of tarmac you can see ahead. The way this 'limit point' seems to move helps you to interpret the bend and ride accordingly. This is a technique you need to be shown but next time you are on the road look at the triangle of tarmac on a bend and watch how it behaves. This technique teaches you to scan and look ahead whilst driving and riding. If you get it you will find many people brake too far into a corner. Remember that when cornering to the right you lean into the oncoming traffic so should not use the central line when cornering.

But be careful.... please

Dustboy    pirate
28/05/2013 at 12:54

So how do peeps cope where you can't see where you are going and it's single width road, eg Ranmore/Whitedown hill etc. Must admit I am frying brakes and 10mph tops. There is no way I would be able to stop from 30-40 mph when a car comes round the corner. Bike lessons needed but cycling clubs are a bit stuck up their own arse IMO.

 

 

28/05/2013 at 13:06
button mushroom wrote (see)

recently i have been getting nervous riding my bike down hills. does anybody have the same problem as me and can anybody help ?

 

Wiggo?

Is that you?

28/05/2013 at 13:19

Steepest hill I've chucked the bike down was one called Ley Hill near Bovingdon. 

It goes down at one gradient, into a dip and then straight back up the other side at a similar gradient. If you get it right you can almost make it up and out.

Scary thing is going down and find yourself staring into the road going back up the other side. Seems almost 90 degrees to each other.

Highest speed was 43mph whereas a mate of mine did 46mph. Because he was mad enough to slipstream me on the way down and then sprint past pushing the 53-11 all out to do it. Nuts!

28/05/2013 at 13:30
Dustboy wrote (see)

So how do peeps cope where you can't see where you are going and it's single width road, eg Ranmore/Whitedown hill etc. Must admit I am frying brakes and 10mph tops. There is no way I would be able to stop from 30-40 mph when a car comes round the corner. Bike lessons needed but cycling clubs are a bit stuck up their own arse IMO.

 

Simple - adapt to the conditions.   I don't think any decent descender would go balls out on a steep bendy single track with traffic on - you just have to make sure your brakes and braking surfaces are in good nick and you have the skill to react quickly.  But on clear open wide roads with good visibility, just let go and keep looking ahead for hazards.

And it's like many things - some people are better at it than others - and many are prepared to park their brains at the top of the hill and take risks.

When I hit 68mph in IMCH I'd already descended that hill 3x (once in practice, 2x in the event) so knew what to expect when I went for it on the 3rd lap - I knew precisely where the hazards were (very few as it happens) so could choose my line and being closed I didn't need to worry about any traffic coming along.  But I was also concentrating all the way down!

And to improve your descent bike handling skills - get off road.  You'll learn to react very quickly to hazards and put trust in your bike (if it's up to the task) knowing that if you screw up it's likely to be your fault and not the bike's as good MTBs will take much more abuse than most people can throw at them.   Sure, mechanical failures happen but if you look after your bike, it shouldn't happen at all.

Edited: 28/05/2013 at 13:32
1 to 20 of 39 messages
Previously bookmarked threads are now visible in "Followed Threads". You can also manage notifications on these threads from the "Forum Settings" section of your profile settings page to prevent being sent an email when a reply is made.
Forum Jump  

RW competitions

RW Forums