Turbo Set up Advice

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TR
18/01/2009 at 12:37

My Tack Sirius Turbo has arrived and I've set it up. I need to get a new chain on the bike (hoepfully arriving in post tomorrow) before I can adjust the rolling resistance though.

It says to remove the quick release mechanism from the bike wheel and fit the one that comes with the turbo every time you want to turbo. Do folks really do this ? It looks the same size as the bike one to me.

D74
18/01/2009 at 13:20

You must swap them.  The Taxc one fits snugly into the trainer and provides all the support - you don't want that coming loose as you are in the middle of a sprint on the trainer.  Equally, the Taxc ones aren't brilliant for use on the road as they seem to have a tendancy to work loose without the clamp pressing on them, and they are very heavy. 

I have a separate tyre/wheel for the trainer so I admit it's not a proble, for me, but it's not exactly a huge problem is it?

TR
18/01/2009 at 16:00

Fair enough, thank you.

I didnt realise that they came right out, I thought it was part of the wheel !

18/01/2009 at 16:56
I don't swop them and I've never had one come loose.
18/01/2009 at 19:11
I think cos there is so many types of skewers the one provided is meant for the job, as Pops said you don't 'have' to but as Dunc said, if you have 30 secs its no big deal. However, if the weather stays the way it is, it;ll be rude to stay indoors
18/01/2009 at 19:45

Yes, if your existing skewer fits OK then it fits and there is no need to swop it.   It's just that with so many different shaped skewers nowadays they have to provide one that definitely fits and they are just recommending you use that rather than faff about saying you might be able to use your existing skewer and you might not.   Basically if it holds it solid with the existing one just use that.  

From memory the tacx skewer also has a hole in one end so it can adapt to narrower spaced rear triangles - well the one that came with mine did but that's a few years old now.

D74
18/01/2009 at 20:04
Pops - Sorry to disagree, but the taxc ones are designed to fit into the lugs within the turbo frame, and the side with the lever is especially deep beyound the lever  to provide the support needed for when you are riding.  I can accept that using the tacx outside, assuming yours hold better than my (admittedly very old) one, but I would never want to advise anyone to try riding on a turbo with the incorrect  skewer.
TR
18/01/2009 at 20:08

It does indeed have a hole in the end.

I agree its only 30 secs, just wondered cos I only have one road bike. 

I dont intend to be rude and do intend to get outdoors quite often, but  rather than tag the occasional hour onto my 20 Mins commute to work I'll do an hour on the turbo first. And do the odd hard hour here and there of an evening.

I'm a cycling novice so am hopeful it'll help my improvement.

TR
18/01/2009 at 20:10
Anyway, thanks for the help, I'll try it out tomorrow (when the chain arrives).
D74
18/01/2009 at 20:22

May be useful info, but the chain as sent will probably be a few links too long.  Compare it with the old one, but you normally need to take a few inches out before you fit it.  Only saying as you said you're a cycling newbie and may not realise.

18/01/2009 at 20:53
TR wrote (see)

My Tack Sirius Turbo has arrived and I've set it up. I need to get a new chain on the bike (hoepfully arriving in post tomorrow) before I can adjust the rolling resistance though.

It says to remove the quick release mechanism from the bike wheel and fit the one that comes with the turbo every time you want to turbo. Do folks really do this ? It looks the same size as the bike one to me.


Santa brought me a Sirius for Christmas, very happy with it.  I brought a cheaper version of the same make wheel (so can use it for backup), put their skewer and a turbo tyre on it.  I think it will get through normal tyres quite quick.

Theirs is held in place in the lugs very well, giving a lot of confidence.  Good luck.

Edited: 18/01/2009 at 20:59
TR
18/01/2009 at 21:02

D74 - thanks. All advice is most welcome - itching to get turbo-ing, I hope it arrives tomorrow.

NE - thanks

I actually received two of em, cos my adress was put on somebody elses turbo box too. I reckoned that once Mr Clough phones up to wondering where his Turbo is they'll check the despatch info and might twig that I've got it. So I contacted the shop and told em, they were most impressed by my honesty and so I asked em for a cheeky bit of "goodwill" as a reward - to which they agreed. Not sure what it is yet though, but I reckon I could have bagged a few quid for the turbo on E-bay. 

18/01/2009 at 21:17
You aren't really disagreeing Dunc - if the standard skewer fits the turbo then it's fine - if it doesn't then not fine which is what you are saying too - at one time everyone just used a traditional type skewer in the turbo and thought nothing of it.
18/01/2009 at 21:46
"I'm a cycling novice so am hopeful it'll help my improvement."

Hey, if its good enough for the pros its good enough for us. And yes there is a definate place for turbo sets against getting all kitted up for an hour on the roads.

18/01/2009 at 21:56
Iron Rose wrote (see)
"I'm a cycling novice so am hopeful it'll help my improvement." 

Hey, if its good enough for the pros its good enough for us. And yes there is a definate place for turbo sets against getting all kitted up for an hour on the roads.


I'd say I'm a realative (racing) novice, and turbo novice.  I'm sure many people will say getting  out on the road is what you need.  But workouts on my turbo with Spinerval training dvds have been excellent. 
TR
20/01/2009 at 22:03

Chain on - had to remove 3 links (good for spares on long rides !), and turbo set up. I found it better with a lower turbo resisatnce and used the bike gears (similar to the ones I would use on the road) - otherwise it was slipping a bit.

Banged out 60 mins. Thats opened the door to a whole new world of aerobic abuse.

PSC    pirate
22/01/2009 at 08:33
TR... if you want to carry a spare link, I would recomend that you get a speed link.  Screw out the broken pin, whack the speed link in and connect the two ends of the chain and ride off.  I've got one on the chain all the time so that I can take it off the bike for cleaning.  I blagged a couple of them for free from the LBS when I was getting a load of other stuff.  One on the chain and one in my saddle bag as my emergency kit.
TR
31/01/2009 at 23:41

Good idea on the speed link. I was thinking of carrying the 3 spare links.

been using the turbo for a couple of weeks and its great stuff - but flipping hard work. I've been struggling to get my HR up due to my numpty cycling legs, but have started pedalling bigger gears and am getting used to it a bit.

I noticed a bit of tyre wear after a recent session and the wheel was coming to a stop quite quickly after stopping pedalling. I had the resistance set to level 2 (of 10). So I backed the adjustment off a bit and used it on level 4 today and then used the bike gears to adjust the cadence.

How do others folks adjust the level and resistance ? How do you know when it is properly adjusted ?

D74
01/02/2009 at 10:24
You should so a roll down test.  The roller should be pressed so that it just slips when you accelerate hard from standstill, but then doesn't slip when in use.  A turbo tyre will make the whole experience a lot better.
01/02/2009 at 18:29
Check which way the resistance goes.  For some reason mine has 1 as the hardest and 10 as the easiest.
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