wannabe ultra runner?

share your ambitions/goals/training here on a 'newbie ultra' thread........

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24/04/2014 at 20:40

Wondering whether I should get a few marathons under my belt before tackling an ultra, or maybe a 30 mile first rather than a 45? Have entere London marathon again and could always go for the royal parks ultra, 30 later next year, then county to capital in 2016? Having done no trails, wondering if I am being over ambitious??? Then again only live once and I like a challenge... also regarding the idea of a race, I have no intention of racing the others on an ultra, completing would be enough even if I was last!

24/04/2014 at 20:44

Dank Art: I'm sure lots will think it's madness but it's up to you as long as there are no qualifying criteria, you might actually want to enter a marathon to just use it as a LSR one weekend, making sure you just do it as LSR speed and do a half the day after, get a bit of experience of being around people and just gives your training a bit of a focus point. 

It's ambitious but hey, that's what dreams are  

24/04/2014 at 20:56

True, I think I need to sort my injury out first then see how I feel.... Keep reading stuff about ultra running, and really fancy the challenge, so it's making me desperate to get back out and run.... Frustration, swimming at the gym just doesn't compensate for 6am run along the coast!

24/04/2014 at 23:25

LouP252: Problem with the Thames Trot is that the last two years it's been flooded off the path and onto an alternative, less easy to navigate route including a lot of road...

25/04/2014 at 07:59

Dank- art- re: speed in ultras- I am a tiny bit quicker over the half marathon, and about 4:20 marathon pace. I have never ended up over cut- offs for the races I've done, but am usually comfortalby in the last 10 runners. I think the tail-enders generally get great support ( perhaps because everyone is relieved to see them finally arrive, so they can get home at last!). I don't know how well marathon pace converts to ultra pace, becuase so many other factors cme into play- weather, underfoot conditions,time spent messing about at checkpoints/ getting post, etc- simple ability to keep plodding onwards is probably as important as marathon speed, and until you've tried the longer distances, you will never know- a 30iler is a very gentle introduction: I went 30, 42, 30, 42(dnf'd), 57, 35, 57 miles for my first 3 years- worth of ultras- each step up has been fine. Iwouldn't have liked to jump straight to 57 miles!

25/04/2014 at 09:27

I went 50K, marathon, 30-miler, 50-miler in my first year reaching past HM. Made some mistakes, such as being drawn in to keeping up with some faster runners in the first half  of the 30-miler, which was a good learning experience as I paced my 50-miler quite well and finished in the time I wanted. I understand that some people prefer the challenge of -not- being sure they can make the distance. Personally I prefer to be able to tell myself, in any bad bits, that I know I -can- do this.

25/04/2014 at 10:10
That goes without saying DB.
25/04/2014 at 14:14

Tomorrow is my first 'long' run since Manchester, it's going to be 10 miles including 1 steep hill which I would normally run up. Am I going to get any benefit by running a 25/5 session for 10 miles ? If not, at what distance run would it be best to start adopting this strategy ? Cheers

25/04/2014 at 14:15

Same sort of question re food really. On my marathon training runs I never used to eat anything while I was running but might, not always, take a couple of gels. Is a food strategy required on a 10 miler ?

25/04/2014 at 17:52

Won't really get the feel of run walk over only 10miles but need to start somewhere so might as well go for it and see how it feels, I'd try doing two or three lots  of 25/5 then shorter as well 5/1 just to get a quick feel of the differences. 

25/04/2014 at 18:56

Thanks for all the suggestions and advice. I think my best bet is to get back into marathon training, so I am doing 15-18 milers for my weekend long run, up to 20 weeks before the Country to Capital, then I can get into a training plan properly....I can then see if I am on track for doing it, and enter the race later this year....if I get in leonine marathon too, I'll be marathon fit in jan do can just continue the training until April...

what sort of overall mileage should I be looking at doing up to the 45 mile/ultra training plan start, seems weekly mileage should be quite high, maybe 40-50 miles? Is that right?

 

 

25/04/2014 at 19:38

35 aversge for a month maybe then step upto your 40 plus

25/04/2014 at 20:09

If you can get up to 45 over a weekend, e.g. 25/20 on Sat/Sun then you'll be ready for C2C  When I was training for my first 50 I did a lot of marathons with another long run on the "other weekend day". As marathons normally happen on Sundays, this meant an easy 20 on  Saturday.

As a bit of an aside, last year I did all my long runs with walk breaks. when I then returned to try and run a marathon non-stop, (gasp) I couldn't do it and had to take walk breaks! It's taken a while, but I'm slowly building the long continuous runs up again, I guess the moral of the story is if you only do one type of training then that's what you'll become good at - specificity I think it's called  A bit of diversity is probably a good thing!

25/04/2014 at 21:16

18/15 would be good enough for C2C, if you wern't too woried about your time. 

25/04/2014 at 23:20

Dank-art, I leapt from half marathon to 54 miles in the Highlands.  In a half marathon I'm middle of the pack.  In an ultra, I'm in the last half dozen.  But, unlike in shorter races, I'm unlikely to be overtaken by a smurf.  Ultras are less about speed and more about the relentless triumph of bloody mindedness over common sense.  Ohhh, and about eating.  Whatever you do, keep eating.  

And be warned.  I finished that 54 miler, but for the last ten miles I was quite literally biting my lip to stop myself crying out every time I put weight on my right foot.  So, whilst it can be done, I wouldn't neccessarily recommend it.   A more gradual approach is less painful.  (But possibly less fun.)

26/04/2014 at 06:30

well said Peronel sums it up perfectly

26/04/2014 at 06:55

thanks for this, yes I am definitely just about finishing and not about racing, is 45 miles a massive leap from a marathon distance???? 

Are there any good 30 mile ultras coming up around the same time as Country to capital, as mentioned before I'd like to do the Royal Parks ultra, but it's full up this year and so will have to wait until October next ear, I did the half marathon at Royal parks way back in 2012 and loved the organisation, atmosphere and the crowds  as well as running through london, so it has quite some appeal, although £200 entry, not so appealing......

26/04/2014 at 06:59

the croyden Ultra is 30miles in july 6th i think.DA

26/04/2014 at 07:04

July is far too soon, need to get back into training, as had injury just before the London Marathon which didn't help having to run 26 miles on, just about ready to step back into running now, so won't be ultra fit by July!

Edited: 26/04/2014 at 07:04
26/04/2014 at 07:59

I don't think its the distance that's the big leap, but the terrain and the mindset.  Rough ground, stiles, hills, navigation and pig farms (really!) all dramatically effect how you perceive the distance.  Ultras require you to slow down, walk sometimes, stop for a sandwich break or to refill the water bottle or check the map.

You haven't said what your injury is, but if it allows, hiking would be as good training as running right now.

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