Do this 10-minute post-run workout to avoid running injuries

Lumberjack squats

Interlock your fingers above your head. Lower into a squat while swinging your arms down. Rise back up while swinging your arms back overhead.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Squat to knee raise

Lower into a squat, then quickly drive your right knee as high as possible out to your side. Lower your right leg back down, then repeat on the other side.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Stability knee drivers (right)

With your arms in running position, brace your core and drive your right knee up as high as possible. Lower to standing and repeat.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Action/reaction (right)

Drive your right knee up and extend it forward, to mimic the motion of running. Flex your right foot and scrape the ground.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Single-leg squats (right)

Lift your left leg off the ground, keeping the leg slightly bent. Bend your right knee and lower down into a squat. Pause, then return to standing.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Leaning rotations with reach (right)

Stand on your right leg; lean forward and extend your left leg back. Rotate your torso as you reach your left hand to your right foot.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Lunge to glute kick (right)

Step back with your right leg and lower down into a lunge. Come back up to standing and kick your right foot back toward your glutes.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Lunge to front-knee drive (right)

Step back with your right leg and lower down into a lunge. Come back up and drive your right knee up towards your chest.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Stability knee drivers (left)

With your arms in running position, brace your core and drive your left knee up as high as possible. Lower back to standing and repeat.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Action/reaction (left)

Drive your left knee up and then extend it forward, to mimic the motion of running. Flex your left foot and scrape the ground with your forefoot.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Single-leg squats (left)

Lift your right leg off the ground, keeping the leg slightly bent. Bend your left knee and lower down into a squat. Pause, then return to standing.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Leaning rotations with reach (left)

Stand on your left leg; lean forward, extending your right leg back. Rotate your torso as you reach your right hand to your left foot.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Lunge to glute kick (left)

Step back with your left leg and lower down into a deep lunge. Come back up and kick your left foot back toward your glutes.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Lunge to front knee drive (left)

Step back with your left leg and lower down into a deep lunge. Come back up and drive your left knee powerfully up towards your chest.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Walkouts

Stand tall. Reach down to put your palms on the ground. Walk out until you are in a plank position. Walk your hands back to your feet. Return to standing.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Balance beams

Get in a plank position. With your back flat, raise your right arm and left leg parallel to the floor. Return to the plank. Repeat with your left arm and right leg.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Forwards walkovers

Step forward with your right leg, lifting your leg high, as if you are going over a hurdle. Repeat with the left leg. Continue alternating legs.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Backwards walkovers

Step backward with your right leg, lifting your leg high, as if you are clearing a hurdle behind you. Repeat with your left leg. Continue alternating legs.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Alternating leg swings

Extend your arms in front of your body. Swing your right leg forward. Bring it back down. Then swing your left leg forward. Continue alternating legs.

Photo by Matt Rainey

Salutations

Come into prayer position, palms together in front of your chest. Take a deep breath, exhale and circle your hands out to your sides, then up overhead.

Photo by Matt Rainey

When Jay Cardiello ran as an amateur track athlete at university, he never took the time to work on the post-run extras that keep a body healthy. ‘After a workout, I just wanted to go home,’ he says. ‘I ended up with a cracked tailbone, which cut my college career short.’ As Cardiello rehabbed his back, he noted the muscular weaknesses and imbalances that had contributed to his fracture. He resumed running with a new a commitment to staying strong and balanced.

Cardiello wants runners to benefit from all he’s learned on the road to recovery. His goal is to help runners go faster and further – without getting hurt. That’s why he created this 10-minute post-run routine to build stability. The workout, designed by Cardiello specifically for Runner’s World, is short, simple and doesn’t require much space or any equipment. Do the stability routine shown on the pages that follow after an easy run. The 20 moves feature core and one-legged strength work. ‘Investing just 10 minutes will make you stronger and also happier,’ says Cardiello, below left, now a strength and conditioning coach who works with sports teams and celebrities. ‘You’ll enjoy running more, knowing you are taking care of your body.’

Cardiello’s comprehensive, focused 10-minute routine (spend 30 seconds doing each exercise and work to increase the number of reps as you get stronger) builds leg and core strength. Many of the moves here are single-legged; this is designed to mimic the demands of running (which is, essentially, a one-legged balancing act repeated over and over) and also to prevent the development of asymmetrical imbalances that can affect performance and increase your risk of injury. A mere 10 minutes a couple of times a week to become a stronger, healthier runner? It’s what they call a no-brainer.