Woman ran 18 miles of London Marathon with a broken pelvis, mistaking it was cramp

Whilst running 26.2 miles is often painful, its normally nowhere near as bad as what Karla Gregory experienced at this year’s London Marathon. In an interview with the Metro newspaper, the mum-of-one explained how she mistook a broken pelvis for muscle cramp, going on to complete 18 miles of the marathon.

Gregory, 48, said she was only five miles into the race when she felt a twinge in her right thigh, that became noticeably painful with each step. After months of training for the event, she did not want to pull out and carried on jogging and walking for another 13 miles, whilst being helped by fellow runners along the way.

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Eventually, Gregory had to stop as she was in agony. She was quickly taken to Homerton Hospital in Hackney, where medics informed her she had fractured her pelvis and faced more than two months of recovery.

Image: Mercury

Gregory, from Devon told Metro: “It was only at five miles so I just thought it was cramp. We’d been stood around quite a while and it was really hot that day.

“By 10 miles the pain kept coming and going. I’d get into a pace and then it would start cramping again. I was starting to get quite tearful, but the crowds were amazing.

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“When they said I’d broken my pelvis I suppose my biggest disappointment was not finishing the marathon – especially because I was over halfway there.

Gregory was raising money in memory of her friend Adrian Beaumont, who died in a car crash in September 2017.

“I was running for the RNLI and raising money for a lifeboat in Adrian’s memory a she was a keen sailor and had his own boat.”

After walking on crutches and only being able to open her legs by 4mm, Gregory is rebuilding her fitness in an attempt to take part in more fundraising runs. On 9th June, she managed to take part in a 5km race on her crutches.

We wish Gregory a speedy recovery.