What’s Hot On The Forum: Archive

For the week ending 23 December 2007 by kittenkat

HOT TO TROT

HAPPY CHRISTMAS!!!

  • This year I have decided to really limit my sending of Christmas cards because although some people may find it a bit "bah humbug" of me, the waste of it all was playing on my mind. I am instead using electronic forms of media to send my good wishes - some of you may have already received a FB Smile (I think it was a smile) from me. This goes to all those Forumites I have met socially, raced with, forumed with or even generally just annoyed in the background! Have a lovely Christmas and a fantastic new year. I hope everyone's dreams, hopes and aspirations come to fruition in 2008." – IronMin-ce Pies
  • I'd like to say merry Christmas and thank you each and every one of my ladies you are all so special to me. – Mini Me1
  • Merry Christmas to you all. Special mention to the Runners Arms, the Wagon Train, Moderately Annoyed threads. And to NGL, Welsh Alex and Tickled Pink in particular for being supportive, non-judgmental and caring friends. – Sweetest Thing Thong Merrily on High
  • Christmas wishes to everyone who has kept me entertained this year on the forum, what did I do before I found this place? Special hugs to the people underneath, the counters and those who enjoy expanding their minds on the punning, word association and crazy sentence threads. And to the post your last runners and 30-mile challengers - happy running and may we all post PBs in 2008. xx – B with bells on
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DIFFERENCE BETWEEN JOGGING AND RUNNING?

  • Is there a difference between jogging and running...or is a jog a slow run? It has always bothered my father, who hates being called a Jogger - even at 63! – IronDuke
  • Jogging suggests someone not very serious about it, whereas running suggests purpose and athleticism! - …and a Wilkie in a Pear Tree
  • Runners will go out in the worst weather conditions. Joggers generally won't. – Siance
  • I read something that I don’t really agree with, but apparently technically a runner is someone who does under a 9-minute mile. I think it's silly. I agree with Wilkie though - runners put more into it and take it more seriously. It's like those annoying people who go swimming in training lanes, and do a bobbing breastroke with their heads about the water so as not to wet the hair. – PloddingOn
  • Jogger is a term used by non-runners for something they don't understand. – Beware Of The Fish
  • There's no such thing as jogging. It doesn't exist. You can't jog. You can walk or you can run. There's nothing in between (unless you're a horse.. then you can trot and canter). - M.ister W
  • I've always liked the term jogger - I think it implies easy relaxed running, no particular purpose other than maybe general fitness - much more attractive than the idea of slogging away at some silly 200m intervals or other sorts of rubbish lots of running clubs have you doing. If you are fit then most of your running should be jogging - nice and effortless. A lot of those that take offence at the word jogger should be pleased that someone thinks them capable of jogging. - popsider
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SO, SO COLD!

  • It's so so cold outside and my 'good girl' four training runs a week have stopped. How do you get through the winter? – Blonde007
  • Once you start running, your body gets warm! Wrap up and then peel the layers away when running. -20 with wind chill is my record... – Tri Taffia
  • My wife, a complete novice, went out jogging with me at 7pm last night. If she can - you can. Mind you she is as hard as nails... - Stump
  • I have to say the cold weather is doing wonders for my speed work... the faster I run the quicker I get back home to a hot shower! – Christmas time callycat and wine
  • Don’t mind the cold as long as you have a base layer top and leggings, hate cold AND rain together though, balls of ICE then – Chilli Pepper
  • I like running in the cold crisp air, what I don't like is when I get back to the house and it feels far too hot ... cue an argument with the girl friend about turning the thermostat down – HarryB
  • I love winter running. Breathable layers and gloves are key, and a buff to keep my ears warm (head gets too hot in a beanie). I like the fact that your eyelashes have little icicles on them when it's really cold. Down side is.. whump! That'll be black ice – Siance
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GYM SHUT OVER CHRISTMAS... WHAT TO DO?

  • I run 35K a week on the treadmill. I used to run outdoors but tried the gym after getting tired of stopping to cross roads, bad weather, and of course, it being dark when I get in from work and me being a young female. Now, I realise I'm letting slip that I'm rather fanatical about running but the gym is shut quite a bit over the Christmas period, more than my 2 rest days! I'm quite happy to run outdoors but how (without buying expensive new equipment) can I make sure my run is the same intensity and length? I find I work harder on the treadmill cos I keep the speed constant and set the incline to a steady 3.0 - 2.5 – gemma davies 4
  • Eat drink and be merry - Let it Smo, let it Smo, let it Smo
  • Gemma, just get out there and run. No such thing as bad weather, just bad kit. – Sezz
  • Doesn’t pay to get too obsessive about a routine - use the holidays to enjoy the daylight - plenty of space to run in and just have fun with your exercise. Even if you skip the gym for the hols - it really won’t harm you. And probably – cougie
  • I understand your anxieties, what with being a young female. But over the holiday period and esp on Crimbo and Boxing days you'll find that everyone else in indoors either eating and drinking themselves silly or traipsing round the sales ... so you should find outdoor running a less hassled experience. More generally, another good time to run outdoors is any evening when the England footie squad are playing an important match. Last time they were against Argentina the streets were so deserted I thought WW3 had broken out ... – Muttley
  • Find a friend or two to run with. – Chris.52
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For the week ending 18 December 2007

HOT TO TROT

HAPPY CHRISTMAS!!!

  • This year I have decided to really limit my sending of Christmas cards because although some people may find it a bit "bah humbug" of me, the waste of it all was playing on my mind. I am instead using electronic forms of media to send my good wishes - some of you may have already received a FB Smile (I think it was a smile) from me. This goes to all those Forumites I have met socially, raced with, forumed with or even generally just annoyed in the background! Have a lovely Christmas and a fantastic new year. I hope everyone's dreams, hopes and aspirations come to fruition in 2008." – IronMin-ce Pies
  • I'd like to say merry Christmas and thank you each and every one of my ladies you are all so special to me. – Mini Me1
  • Merry Christmas to you all. Special mention to the Runners Arms, the Wagon Train, Moderately Annoyed threads. And to NGL, Welsh Alex and Tickled Pink in particular for being supportive, non-judgmental and caring friends. – Sweetest Thing Thong Merrily on High
  • Christmas wishes to everyone who has kept me entertained this year on the forum, what did I do before I found this place? Special hugs to the people underneath, the counters and those who enjoy expanding their minds on the punning, word association and crazy sentence threads. And to the post your last runners and 30-mile challengers - happy running and may we all post PBs in 2008. xx – B with bells on
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DIFFERENCE BETWEEN JOGGING AND RUNNING?

  • Is there a difference between jogging and running...or is a jog a slow run? It has always bothered my father, who hates being called a Jogger - even at 63! – IronDuke
  • Jogging suggests someone not very serious about it, whereas running suggests purpose and athleticism! - …and a Wilkie in a Pear Tree
  • Runners will go out in the worst weather conditions. Joggers generally won't. – Siance
  • I read something that I don’t really agree with, but apparently technically a runner is someone who does under a 9-minute mile. I think it's silly. I agree with Wilkie though - runners put more into it and take it more seriously. It's like those annoying people who go swimming in training lanes, and do a bobbing breastroke with their heads about the water so as not to wet the hair. – PloddingOn
  • Jogger is a term used by non-runners for something they don't understand. – Beware Of The Fish
  • There's no such thing as jogging. It doesn't exist. You can't jog. You can walk or you can run. There's nothing in between (unless you're a horse.. then you can trot and canter). - M.ister W
  • I've always liked the term jogger - I think it implies easy relaxed running, no particular purpose other than maybe general fitness - much more attractive than the idea of slogging away at some silly 200m intervals or other sorts of rubbish lots of running clubs have you doing. If you are fit then most of your running should be jogging - nice and effortless. A lot of those that take offence at the word jogger should be pleased that someone thinks them capable of jogging. - popsider
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SO, SO COLD!

  • It's so so cold outside and my 'good girl' four training runs a week have stopped. How do you get through the winter? – Blonde007
  • Once you start running, your body gets warm! Wrap up and then peel the layers away when running. -20 with wind chill is my record... – Tri Taffia
  • My wife, a complete novice, went out jogging with me at 7pm last night. If she can - you can. Mind you she is as hard as nails... - Stump
  • I have to say the cold weather is doing wonders for my speed work... the faster I run the quicker I get back home to a hot shower! – Christmas time callycat and wine
  • Don’t mind the cold as long as you have a base layer top and leggings, hate cold AND rain together though, balls of ICE then – Chilli Pepper
  • I like running in the cold crisp air, what I don't like is when I get back to the house and it feels far too hot ... cue an argument with the girl friend about turning the thermostat down – HarryB
  • I love winter running. Breathable layers and gloves are key, and a buff to keep my ears warm (head gets too hot in a beanie). I like the fact that your eyelashes have little icicles on them when it's really cold. Down side is.. whump! That'll be black ice – Siance
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GYM SHUT OVER CHRISTMAS... WHAT TO DO?

  • I run 35K a week on the treadmill. I used to run outdoors but tried the gym after getting tired of stopping to cross roads, bad weather, and of course, it being dark when I get in from work and me being a young female. Now, I realise I'm letting slip that I'm rather fanatical about running but the gym is shut quite a bit over the Christmas period, more than my 2 rest days! I'm quite happy to run outdoors but how (without buying expensive new equipment) can I make sure my run is the same intensity and length? I find I work harder on the treadmill cos I keep the speed constant and set the incline to a steady 3.0 - 2.5 – gemma davies 4
  • Eat drink and be merry - Let it Smo, let it Smo, let it Smo
  • Gemma, just get out there and run. No such thing as bad weather, just bad kit. – Sezz
  • Doesn’t pay to get too obsessive about a routine - use the holidays to enjoy the daylight - plenty of space to run in and just have fun with your exercise. Even if you skip the gym for the hols - it really won’t harm you. And probably – cougie
  • I understand your anxieties, what with being a young female. But over the holiday period and esp on Crimbo and Boxing days you'll find that everyone else in indoors either eating and drinking themselves silly or traipsing round the sales ... so you should find outdoor running a less hassled experience. More generally, another good time to run outdoors is any evening when the England footie squad are playing an important match. Last time they were against Argentina the streets were so deserted I thought WW3 had broken out ... – Muttley
  • Find a friend or two to run with. – Chris.52
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For the week ending 2 December 2007 by Ellie101

Hot to trot

FLM ALTERNATIVES

  • I was so disappointed to receive the 'Sorry, you are not in' magazine yesterday. I have entered the ballot four times now and have been rejected each time. I don't understand why some people get in year after year, while others get rejected all of the time! - monkeyfingers
  • Loads of other marathons out there. Why get hung up on this one? - Tri Taffia
  • Don’t despair - you are one of many. Who knows how they allocate places? If we knew then everyone would simply 'adapt' their applications accordingly so it's not surprising that they keep it a mystery! - Yidboy
  • I got a place in the Hamburg Marathon in about five minutes yesterday. I did FLM two years ago and I won't be applying again because of this "Will I, won't I?" nonsense. It's a great race, but there are other great races out there. Don't let it get you down! - Bowipod
  • It's not unusual to be rejected many times. I've been accepted once since 1992 (missed applying one year so broke the uninterrupted rejections cycle, and am running this year after six consecutive rejections on the "five strikes and you're in" ticket). It happens. I fully expect to be rejected next time as well. - Helegant back in training
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STIRRING SOUNDTRACKS

  • Just wanted an insight into everyone's fave choons for running. I find certain songs make me run faster or are good for hills and would like some new ones to prevent boredom!- Aitch
  • I have on occasion listened to a book on a long run - it keeps me from wandering mentally. - JustJamie
  • I'm afraid only really nasty thrash metal, or hip-hop keeps me going but I usually throw some blues, soul and other stuff in the mix to keep me surprised. - DW777
  • I like a bit of The Who for running, no particular reason why. Also you can't beat a bit of Take That or other equally embarrassing cheesy pop! - Littlelawyer
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DAILY STRETCHING

  • I seem to get seriously tight muscles whenever I train. It doesn't matter what distance, how frequently, or what intensity - if the muscles are in use, they start going really tight. The only way I seem to be able to keep myself from having painfully tight muscles is to stretch everything (shoulders, chest, lats, lower back, and of course all of my leg muscles) for about 30 minutes in the morning, and then again in the evening, every day. Does everyone have to stretch this much or are some people more susceptible to developing tight muscles than others? - Garr
  • I hardly ever stretch. I used to do a bit at the end of a gym session, but I haven't been to the gym for years. - popsider
  • I’ve noticed I’m a lot less flexible than a few years ago. I used to be able to bend forwards and lay my palms flat on the floor, these days it’s an effort to touch my toes. Something to work on perhaps? - Bouncing Barlist
  • Is it because of your cycling? That shortens the muscles in the back of the legs. I'm in the hardly-any-stretching league here - basically only when I've done a spin class or run with others do I do some stretches. - cougie
  • I don't stretch every day but I do two or three yoga classes a week and a few other classes which have a stretching bit at the end (very short, only about five minutes). When swimming a lot I do try and remember to stretch my neck, lats and chest otherwise I am prone to injury and horrible tightness. - Dr Nic Twinks
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CHARITY TARGETS

  • I've just found out I have been rejected for the FLM, so am thinking of applying to a charity for a place. Anyone got any ideas about the best charity to apply to? I think I would be able to raise around £500 but some seem to start around £1900... - Shaun Claffey
  • I'd say apply to ones that hold a personal meaning to you, as it's easier to raise money. For example, I had breast cancer in 2006, so this year I did it for Breakthrough Breast Cancer. I found it easy to raise money as it is a cause I totally believe in, and I could use the tagline 'to help other women be as lucky as I feel I am'. - Nykie
  • To be honest - the cynical part of me says that you may have been rejected if you told them you could only raise £500, especially for FLM. Most GB places ask or expect a target of about £1200 - the more popular ones £1500. You might be lucky to find one for less but that is the way it is at the moment. Good luck! - FINgers
  • So what would happen if you promised to raise x amount, got your Golden Bond place but then couldn't reach the target? - Lardarse
  • I think you'll find that you have to foot the rest of the monies out of your own pocket - martin fox 4
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For the week ending 26 November 2007

Hot to trot

WEIGHT LOSS VS. PERFORMANCE

  • Despite my best intentions, I find myself agreeing with Frank Horwill’s article on weight-height ratios and performance. But how can you achieve the best athletic performance feasible, without starving yourself to death? The obvious temptation is to try and keep losing weight, but this would be a big mistake. There’s obviously a limit - once weight-loss results in the loss of lean muscle mass then a decrease in performance is inevitable. So I guess the central question is, what is the optimum weight-to-height ratio? - mmmm...marmite
  • I am currently 11lbs over my normal racing weight and feel it in training let alone racing. My PBs have often been set when I look gaunt and underweight, which by anyone's standards I was. So it's difficult to know what should be our ideal weight? For our health or for a race PB? - ‘Treadmill’ (Occasional Poster)
  • I love running and it's a big part of my life, but I guess it's just not that important for me that I'm willing to let by body and life be ruled by it. Winning just doesn't mean that much to me.- Nam
  • I certainly think the figure given for women is a little on the unforgiving side. But then, I would, wouldn't I? And, as others have pointed out, there are other health issues to consider when trying to lose weight from a baseline that's already relatively lean. Ah, dammit. What I'm saying is, if I want to lose weight I'll have to stop eating chocolate, and I really, really don't want to do that. - Velociraptor
  • Elites, at their lower weights, get a lot more sleep than we do and don’t have to run around after children, battle round Sainsburys or re-fit the bathroom. They only have to run. I think that makes a big difference. - flyaway
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TASTY SOUPS

  • Soup is my favourite winter warmer. Which soups are your favourites? Post a link/recipe if you can... - Blondiee
  • I'm not a fan of soup - God gave us teeth for a reason. - kittenkat
  • The Covent Garden Soup Company do a nice carrot and coriander, but I've always fancied the soup featured in most hip-hop videos. Take a good handful of bikini-clad beauties, put them in the jacuzzi, switch on and hey presto - Lady Soup! - Badly Drawn Boy
  • Tomatoes and oranges go very well together, as do tomato soup and Mars bars! - smallest one
  • Carrot and cashew nut, from the Veggie Society website. With a spoon of marmite in it too. Yum. It does start to fizz though, if you don't freeze the remainder and leave it on the hob for more than two days. - KatieJane
  • I am a crouton guy myself. I'm dead classy, see? In fact may change my name to Jean de Crouton... - Johnny Blaze
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WINTER WINDCHILL

  • I went for a bike ride this afternoon. Apart from the fact that I was truly sh*te, I was absolutely frozen. I had four layers on top, my fleecy winter running leggings and double-lined socks. The only warm part was my hands as I was wearing ski gloves. My neck and shoulders particularly suffered from the cold and the tips of my ears are still frozen. What do you wear to keep warm? - Darth Vader
  • You can wear a motorcycle balaclava for your head and neck, and Neoprene overshoes over your, err, shoes. Can't you use the force? - candy ollier
  • Top tip from me - I find my forearms get bl**dy freezing while out on a winter cycle which in turn makes my hands not work. You can buy sleeve things for about a tenner, or get an old pair of socks, cut a hole in the toe area...and hey presto, some arm warmers! - Nick L
  • Any windstopper material (doesn't have to be Gore) will help keep the worst of the wind off the body so your inner layers stay warm. I tend only to wear a base layer, windproof jacket and maybe a windproof gilet if it's very cold up top, windstopper tights and normal socks with overshoes as well. But then I do have a good layer of fat to help as well... - fat buddha
  • Just pedal harder – it’s a bugger when the sweat freezes but death follows quite quickly so it doesn’t hurt for long.- Plum
  • I only had my Pirate kit on yesterday. I'm hard, me.- debbo
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ALLERGIES ON RACE DAY

  • If you have an allergy are you supposed to put a large black cross on your race number? I have seen various different versions but wondered about the general consensus of the forum? - Farnie
  • I had a large black cross on my race number because I was… *shudders*… a veteran. - yums
  • I wonder why it’s not a red cross - it would make me think more of medical things than a black one which just makes me think of the plague. - Buney
  • I would have thought writing your medical conditions and allergies on the back of your race number would be a good idea. And if you have a medical condition like diabetes it would be a good idea to wear one of those medical alert bracelets. - Happycat
  • I know a kid who doesn’t go anywhere without his special allergy pen - according to his mum he's allergic to just about anything and everything. Would you have to declare a seafood allergy on the back - just in case they try to treat you with haddock tablets ? (ha ha haddock/headache) Grabs coat... - cougie
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For the week ending 19 November 2007

Hot to trot

REWARDING THE PLODDERS

  • I ran a race recently and was at the prize giving afterwards and thought, why don't we get prizes for being the last runner? Surely we put it just as much effort as the quicker runners! - Prawnie
  • The last person home at our local ladies 5K gets a bouquet of flowers. - Slugsta
  • I know some people dread the idea of being last, and to make a fuss of them for it wouldn't make them feel better. Besides, in longer races the winners have had their prizes and gone home long before I finish (and I'm not last!) - Wilkie
  • You'd get the running equivalent of track stands, with people hovering just the right side of the finishing line for days, until everyone got bored and went home. - Crash Ham.ster
  • Too easy to cheat and wouldn't it be agony to watch? Quite a few races do spot prizes - make a sprint for the line and collapse over the other side and you're quite likely to get one of those in my experience. Actually, I would say on average the quicker runners have spent far more time training than those at the back so have made more 'effort'. That's not to say the relationship between effort and achievement is straight forward. - mellifera
  • I think the clue is actually in the word 'race'. - AndrewSmith
  • Should we also have prizes for all those who are last in their age category too, male and female? And team prizes? Seems a bit elitist to me to give just one prize to the absolute slowest. And you'd need to have dope testing - just to make sure they hadn't taken some kind of performance- impeding drug... - XL-Man
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RACE TIME PREDICTORS

  • I’m interested to hear whether race time predictors work for you. I plugged in my time for 5K and it predicted I should be able to do a 10K about three minutes faster than I have managed. In fact the longer the distance the more it’s out. - Full Up
  • Don't forget they assume that you train properly for whatever distance it is that you are attempting. - Johnny J
  • What was your 5K time and what prediction did it give for 10K? Predictions are generally for the best you could do, based on the best you have done, and achieving your best when racing is the exception not the rule. Plus to achieve your best possible times you need to have everything go right for you (your condition, the course, the weather) and that so rarely happens in longer races (not too often in the shorter ones either). - Big David
  • For me the various predictors work best when predicting races which are not too far apart in length (5K to 10K, 10K to half-marathon). For predicting marathon times I have found that my actual times (for two marathons) are slower than predicted (which I am not surprised about). Many online predictors calculate marathon time as 10K time multiplied by approx. 4.7 (sometimes less). However I suspect that such ratios are based on times for elite runners, and/or runners who were achieving high weekly mileages. I once read an article which linked marathon times to average weekly mileage during the marathon training programme. For example, it suggested that an average of 40 miles per week would result in a marathon time of 10K time multiplied by 5 to 5.3. While it didn't comment on factors such as whether a runner was attempting their first marathon (or their ninth or tenth) I suspect that cumulative mileage over a number of years also has an influence. - Lieutenant Lucerne
  • I have a marathon PB of 3:48 and on that day I passed through the half at 1:47 and 25km at 2:09, which was also a PB. I think it works better for longer distances - I've done sub four minutes for 1K and 23 mins for 5K but never dipped under 48 for 10K. I can run fast for short distances but have a great deal more strength and stamina than speed so do rather better on longer courses. As others have said, the other variables such as training, running history, weather, health, play a big part. - IronWolf
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EMBARRASSING MISHAPS

  • What have you broken and how? Most serious? Most funny? - kittenkat
  • I broke my thumb while I was swimming. I’ve also been hit on the head walking home from work when a squirrel fell out of a tree! I was never sure if it was dead when it fell out of the tree or it died as a result of hitting me on the head... - Ultra Cas
  • I burnt my foot one New Year's Day when a hot chip straight out of the oven went down the side of my (sockless) trainer. - Kwilter
  • I’ve burnt my forehead falling on a heated towel rail while putting knickers on in the bathroom. And sustained a Grade II forearm burn by falling asleep in drunken stupor next to said heated towel rail... - Siance
  • I put my head through a window of the caravan we were staying in for our holidays. I looked out the door and the wind caught it and swung it closed - I didn't react in time. Plus I set my hair on fire using the gas grill...- gingerfurball
  • I once ran myself over with my very own car. That was quite spectacular - and I managed to do £3,000 worth of damage to a neighbour's car in the process. The funny thing (in retrospect) was that she had moved her car because she was having furniture delivered - then my car drove itself into her 'safely' parked car and ran me over in the process. I can laugh about it now but it was an awful shock at the time.- Minty4
  • When my Mum dropped me off at Brownies one night, I stepped out of the car and she drove over my foot. I screamed to her that she'd done it, so she reversed and drove over it again. Hehe. I've also parachuted into a field of sheep which was quite funny - I landed while screaming "Move sheep, move!"- Nykie
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ATHLETE ALLEGIANCE

  • Jon Brown (an elite GB marathon runner, fourth in the last two Olympics) has switched allegiance to Canada after having his lottery funding axed. I think UK Athletics are targeting athletes who will be aiming for 2012, but I feel it’s a bit shabby of him to jump ship after the support he's been given. - haileunlikely
  • But there's a long standing rule in my online quiz rooms that Canada is never the answer. How can he suddenly decide he’s Canadian? - Kwilter
  • Greg Rudeski will have something to say about this. - PottingShed
  • Isn’t it a bit like one of us changing jobs for a better pay and conditions. It's not patriotic but, he has, in effect, been sacked by UK-A. Would you work for your boss for no money except tips? Controversial I know, but this was always going to happen. It's his profession and a short one at that. - Rarebit Man
  • I like the idea that Paula gets funding - she obviously needs it to pay for living abroad. If her 'nationality' was based on where she lives what would she be? - Womble
  • So, to pick up on earlier comments, they get Jon Brown, and we get Lennox Lewis, Owen Hargreaves, and Greg Rudeski. On balance, I think its about an even swap, don't you? - DadOfTwo
  • I'm afraid the days of the plucky Brits winning gold medals on a diet of bread and dripping whilst doing their training between shifts down the local pit have long gone. It costs hard cash. Jon Brown, on the basis of results, is the best male marathon runner we have. UKA have obviously taken the decision that their cash is better spent elsewhere (probably on yet more mediocre sprinters). Patriotism doesn't pay the bills. - FellRunning
  • Good, more money for Christine Ohuruogu. - José
  • She'll be able to afford a PA so she won't miss another drugs test. - Broadsword Calling Danny Boy
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For the week ending 12 November 2007

Hot to trot

VIRTUAL REALITY

  • Did anyone hear the programme on Radio 4 last night about internet behaviour/social networking sites etc? It was discussing if (and why) we disclose more about ourselves online than we would in 'real' situations and whether the rise of social networking sites is creating more division in society or creating more of a community? Over to you... - callycat
  • I would never tell anyone online that I was a 65-year old dirty man with a handlebar moustache, and tendencies to prey on younger female runners. I prefer to keep it a secret. - Coops10
  • I have been sadly disappointed. Everyone has turned out to be who they said they were... no sexual perverts yet. Kids think it's very odd that their Mum goes off to meet with people she's met on the net - we have a bit of reverse parenting here! - Mrs Pig
  • Having children anywhere near a triathlon is bound to corrupt them. All that Lycra... - SoVeryTired
  • I thought staying in and networking on Facebook is the new going out? I think text culture is interesting - how did people ever do any shopping without calling home to see exactly which teabags they should buy? - Buney
  • I am really Nadine Baggett, Celebrity Beauty Editor. I come on here to spread the word about pentapeptides - the hottest new celebrity beauty treatment. But the good news is that you don’t need to pay celebrity prices to get them. If you want more information read my new book. - Johnny Blaze
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FELL RUNNING

  • Is fell running as simple as lots of training on hills? Do I need to train off road in trail shoes or will my regular road shoes do the job on the urban hills where I live? I've got the impression that there seem to be varying degrees of difficulty with the races i.e. I have no navigation skills - so if I did want to race, are there easy-to-follow courses? - vicki: graceless whippet
  • Fell races are not for the faint hearted. Have you considered a club? I'm sure there is a full spectrum of difficulty and distance but expect it to be tough. - Stump
  • Fell running is brilliant. Join the FRA (www.fellrunner.org.uk) for a full list of races and a great magazine, then just select a short, local race which doesn't require experience. The majority of fell races are partially marked and don't require navigational skills, but in the winter you will be required to carry (in a rucksack or bumbag) a compass, map, whistle, spare food and body cover (tights and shell if you're not wearing them). One very important thing - to be a good fell runner you have to like beer. - LizzyB
  • If you've done some cross- country and trail races then you'll have some idea that the fitness requirements are a bit different. The most important thing you'll need to learn is how to descend - sounds daft but fell races are won and lost on the descents, - and even a midfield runner needs to know how to do it. - FellRunning
  • Don't, whatever you do, read “Feet in the Clouds”, an account of one man’s attempt at the Bob Graham round. It will get under your skin and you will be longing to get out there and have a go. I road run but have a love of the hills and will someday retreat to the Lakes (deep sigh...) and get stuck in. It's amazing that fell running doesn't seem to have an upper age limit! - Dalesgirl
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KNEE-WRECKING MYTHS

  • Virtually every time running is mentioned in conversation, some bright spark brings up a story about someone they know who ended up with wrecked knees from running. Is this a real possibility or are these just urban legends? Is running that damaging and if so, why? - andrew pullen
  • You body adapts to specific demands placed upon it. If you do too much running too soon it's possible a part of your knees could become damaged (or any other part of your body for that matter) but a gradual sensible build up of running should incur no damage to your body whatsoever. - Rarebit Man
  • I'm waiting for an arthroscopy for my b*ggered knee. It wasn't caused by running, it was caused by running incorrectly. I would rather have a b*ggered knee than a b*ggered heart, or diabetes, or a stroke. My sister was first among the 'oooo you don't wanna do that, you'll ruin your knees' brigade when I started running. Her current smugness is tempered by the fact that she's still nearly 13 stone and I'm ... not. - Jj
  • It’s footy and rugby that do your knees in. - Plodding Hippo
  • I was behind Alan Hansen at the airport last year - he can barely hobble. And it’s not like he'd have to have treatment on the NHS is it? - cougie
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ALCOHOL ABSTENTION

  • Can someone solve an argument - does running get rid of a flabby belly? I drink a can of lager and usually a bit more every night - this isn’t helping is it? - groder
  • Fact is, a pint of lager is 200 calories. The only way to lose weight is to burn more calories than you take in. That can of lager means you have to run two miles at 9min/mile just to get to the number of calories consumed in a day where you don't drink. If you enjoy the beer and want to keep drinking it, fair play (I'm no saint when it comes to diet/drink) but you'll find it far harder to shift the flab (mine's going nowhere!)- Drunken Marionette
  • Drinking is good for you if you enjoy it. I drink a lot more than you, but I run at least 4 times a week and do exercise bike and or weights on the others. I lost my beer gut (it took a couple of years) but my weight loss has bottomed out now so I don’t think I will ever quite get a six pack but who cares? To me there’s nothing worse than an obsessive fitness fanatic. Suggest you try the GPSNRS (Get P*ssed Saturday Night Run Sunday) training technique as I did Sunday last – it’s a gruelling ordeal but it really works! - Skipper's Mate
  • Drinking beer and 40-50 miles per week - weight 11.5 stone and marathon time 3:20. No beer at all and 40-50 miles per week - weight 10 stone and marathon time 3:02 (I'm as miserable as sin mind...) - Callan
  • I used to drink most nights, I think I probably felt I needed to. I still like a drink now but I tend not to have any alcohol in the house during the week. My fat gut is shrinking and I only run 15 miles per week. It’s much easier to abstain when you actually have to get off your rear and pop to the off-licence. - Sam Dennten
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For the week ending 5 November 2007 by aiki

Hot to trot

DOES CARBO-LOADING ACTUALLY WORK?

  • I have carbo-loaded for my last four marathon events, and have found it to be extremely beneficial each time. However, after talking to many different people in the build-up to races I find that no-one seems to rate it as an important piece of preparation anymore. Has a better method come along, or do people not know enough about carbo-loading to want to do it? - Vicki Thompson
  • I’ve read that the depletion phase (where you cut out all carbs for a few days prior to the loading phase) is no longer considered necessary – it was based on a flawed study which showed depletion to be beneficial but which has since been disproved. I’m pretty sure carbo-loading is still considered very beneficial however (I used it for my one marathon so far and will do so again in the future). - EdB
  • I’m not sure if it works but carbs (and some protein) were very much what my body was craving leading up to my first marathon (just completed – hurrah!). I went right off fatty foods like chocolate and cake which is quite strange for me. - Carol S
  • When I did my first marathon in 1982 (I think!) carbo depletion was the name of the game. Basically, I did my longest run a week before the marathon and I started the race completely knackered. How times have changed, thank heavens. A normal healthy diet and a good pasta meal the day before seems to do the job nowadays. I have chicken with pasta and pesto with a lump of broccoli. Yummy. - fat face
  • I read an article once that said that while men can carbo-load on cakes, sweets or any old rubbish just the night before, women have to eat good-quality carbs for longer. - Finbaar
  • I’ve only once not carbo-loaded for a marathon, and I had a complete 'mare ... though the failure to carbo-load was probably less important than the 14 weeks without training due to injury. I can’t imagine not carbo-loading, and take the glycogen-loading theory as an act of faith. I like to have my main eating day two days before the race, and a relatively light diet (but mainly carbohydrate) the day before. - Velociraptor
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COLD WEATHER GEAR

  • I only started running in April and so have only ever run in a T-shirt, shorts and trainers. However, going for my run this morning, I was absolutely frozen! With winter coming, it’s only going to get worse, so what do you guys wear during the cold days? Would a normal tracksuit suffice or do you buy specialist gear to help stop chafing etc? (For what it’s worth, I try to run 3 times a week, about 8-9K a time – slowly...) - Mark T
  • Some of my running friends go for the woolly hat look, but I can’t wear any hat for more than a couple of miles and just end up having to carry it. It is well worth getting a thin pair of gloves, and seriously, tights – they sound a bit girly I know, but try and find a good manly pair (if there is such a thing), they will help keep your muscles warm, and so prevent injury. - Happy Running
  • I go faster on short runs, and on long slow runs just wear another layer or two, like a sweatshirt, if it is cold enough – I like it cold. But I usually wear a cap, except when it is cloudy and warm. - Big David
  • I second that running tights keep you warm. Tracky bottoms aren’t made for running in so unless you like the feeling of your legs being cold enough to drop off, stop worrying about what others think! I didn’t think I would be seen dead in lycra but I would rather be comfy in the winter. - foofighter11
  • Gloves are a must – if your extremities are warm then you’ll generally feel fine even with just shorts. Tights are great but if you can’t face them you can wear lightweight running trousers made out of microfibre. A long-sleeved wicking top should be fine on its own – perhaps a bit chilly when you start off but you’ll soon warm up! You can always put a light running gilet over the top, or another wicking T-shirt. - Running since 1972 (TM)!
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RUNNER OR JOGGER?

  • There are some interesting letters in the latest RW mag on the runner/jogger distinction. What do you think (if anything) makes the difference? - Ms Plod
  • State of mind – if you think you run then you are a runner, if you think you jog then you are a jogger. - Grendel3
  • It’s a relative term. Running is just that, while jogging is a runner taking it easy, i.e. an easy pace for that individual while warming up or down. Utimately if you are putting in the effort it’s ‘running’ and nobody can kid themselves over that, from elite to first-timer you are the only person you have to prove anything to! - Moe
  • I’ll say what I always say which is... there’s no such thing as jogging so you can’t possibly be a jogger. If you have two legs you only have a choice of two stride patterns - walking or running. If you walk you’re a walker. If you run you’re a runner. Of course, if you’re a horse you can also trot and canter. - M.ister W
  • I couldn’t give a fig, meself. A mate of mine said recently "I saw you out jogging the other day", which I interpreted as "I saw you running at what looked like a comfortable pace the other day..." Fair enough. Although I suppose "Jog, Forrest, jog!" doesn’t have quite the same ring to it. - PhilPub
  • There isn’t a difference. The concept of ‘jogging’, which was invented in the 1960s, was just distance running for fitness’s sake, as opposed to ‘running’ which historically had the connotation ‘as fast as you can’. - Candy Ollier
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MARATHON OVERLOAD

  • I've just checked my bank account and found that my cheque has been cashed for my London marathon entry (I didn't bequeath my entry fee) so I'm in! Only thing is that I was so sure that I wouldn't get in through the ballot that I've now entered Rome marathon which is exactly 4 weeks earlier! Does anyone have experience of doing this much so close together? Both races have so much going for them- in totally different ways - Rome is amazing scenes- and my first run abroad, but I live in London and I think it would be rubbish to miss it - and having done it before, the atmosphere is amazng! - hethstar
  • I suppose it depends if you plan to 'race' both events. I usually attempt a marathon and use it as a 'training run' or 'long run' approximately 5-6 weeks before I actually 'race' a marathon. The most I've done consecutively is 5 maras in 5 weeks (2004). Just go out and enjoy both events. - Flying Ant
  • No problem at all, but don't necessarily expect good times at both. That said, last year I set a PB twice during 11 marathons in 11 weeks - the fourth and the sixth marathon in the series. - Plodding Hippo
  • I did London last year and Stockholm six weeks later. It can be done (obviously) but I just focussed on getting around the both of them injury-free. You may need to alter your goals regarding PBs but maybe use the London as a training run to conserve some energy for Rome. Good Luck! - Slimline chips
  • A couple of years ago I did the New Forest Marathon in 4:21 and four weeks later did Abingdon in 3:43. Admittedly I had a nightmare in the New Forest (it was my first marathon) and walked a lot of the second half but I believe that you should be able to set decent times in both. Don't expect to though - you won't know how the first race will affect you until after the second, but if all goes well then it's certainly possible. Between the first and second races there's no need to bust a gut. Just keep yourself ticking over. - Mikey T
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For the week ending 28 October 2007 by by kittenkat



Hot to trot

WORN-OUT RUNNING SHOES OR OLD FRIENDS?

  • Does anybody else fee attached to their old trainers? I just can’t bring myself to throw them away as I start to think "These guys got me through my first 10 miler" or "I was wearing these fellas when I met such a body" etc. I even feel guilty if I don’t wear a particular pair for a while. Today I thought I would try to give a pair of battered Sauconys a dignified send off by giving them one last run. Just got back and guess what, "I can’t do it!" - Skipper’s Mate
  • I feel the same about some things, like a pair of 20 year old Nike Pegasus that have lived in my garage for years... - nogbat
  • My old trainers are now in a very large heap at the bottom of the wardrobe, I’m struggling to get clothes in now. I think it’s an illness. - Happy Running
  • My old trainees are so minty, they make their own way to the Plaza Community Cinema charity shop to be recycled. - swittle
  • My trainers retire from running duty when they hit 500 miles (which is when, apparently, the support features wear out even if the sole still looks good to go). Once retired they are scrubbed and used for gardening duties until they fall apart. If I already have a scrubbed pair on the go, the next running pair to retire simply gets binned. One day I had a phone call from some builders working in my house. They said they thought there was a gas leak. There definitely was a noxious methane aroma permeating the hallway, where the boiler is. But it wasn't the boiler, it was my retired Nikes! - Muttley
  • My girlfriend refused to kiss me after she caught me kissing the soles of my Brooks after the Cardifff Half Marathon. I got 5 PBs in those shoes. Then a fake con-man physio tried to make me throw them out (I even bought some Mizzunos on his advice) but my new physio (who is chartered) told me they were better for me as I'm too fat for my Mizzunos. I love my shoes but they will reach 500 pretty soon. - M62 Steve
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BEST FIRST-TIME DUATHLON?

  • I love running but would like to try a Duathlon, but I am completely new to it and don’t really know where to look or start, does anyone know a good starter event to have a go at? I am 39 and run at 7.5 minute mile, I was told that there are vet Triathlon events which incorporate the same disciplines but over fewer distances. Links and advice would be appreciated. Just fancied giving it a try along with my normal running. - Gary Wilson 3
  • I'm not an expert but just wanted to recommend giving it a go having recently done my first duathlon. I don't know where you're based but I did the London Duathlon in Richmond Park - lovely venue and a very well organised event. The British Triathlon Federation may be a good place to check listings. I've been warned it's a slippery slope from Duathlon to Triathlon but quite frankly I think I'll give open water swimming a miss for a little while longer... - PhilPub
  • February, March, September and October are the Duathlon months. - Tri Taffia
  • Mud Sweat and Gears at Sherwood Pines could be a start if you fancy an off-road Duathlon, if it is run again next year. Organised by the people at One Step Beyond, this year it was held in April - Extreme Muzzy
  • I'd recommend the Marlow Duathlon. It's a new event for next year (we ran a pilot event a couple of weeks ago) and despite the GB Duathlon Champion turning up for, and winning, the pilot event it will be very beginner-friendly. - M.ister W
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LOUD MUSIC IN GYMS – WHY?

  • Anyone come across this? Why when taking part in a class do they have to have the music on so loud you can't hear yourself think never mind the instructor? Thing is, do they think it encourages anyone? Plus the type of music some of them put on, crikey! - Gym Joey
  • Well I like it. Couldn't imagine spin/rpm/pump/combat without loud music. I can still hear the instructor. If you don't like their music you can always vote with your feet or take an MP3. - Nam
  • What really annoys me about gyms is the music is too loud to hear my MP3 player over. Music in classes is fine: they are designed around it (but good soundproofing is all too rare). There's evidence to suggest that people are most motivated by music they like, which isn't necessarily what others might consider motivating (I hate 'Simply the Best'), so the policy should be pro-Mp3. Mind you, if music enhances your enjoyment of the gym, you'll be there longer and then people will cancel their memberships because it'll be too busy. - Raich
  • Nothing like a bit of pumping trance or happy hardcore to get you going. - Welsh Alex
  • What about a bit of Brainbug...shuffles off to the old CD collection - Buney
  • After a dozen FLM's, sick to death of Chariots of Fire. Every expo, every race.... However at Silverstone standing on the grid at the start do like a bit of Fleetwood Mac while getting revved up raring to go - straycelt
  • Hate loud music when in the gym. Went to a Body Pump session once - and hated it. Totally American. Totally over the top. Nothing to do with correct posture or method just 'do it to the music'. Nearly gagged a couple of times. It was so bad. Never again! - fez
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RUNNING SAFETY

  • A woman was attacked on a local footpath at 11 o’clock at night in my area. I run at 6am twice a week, on different days. Now my husband doesn’t want me to run (understandably). If I don’t run then, I don’t run at all, other than a weekend run. I always stick to main roads that are well lit and always see people walking their dogs. It’s possible for me to run after work at 6pm in the dark, but it would eat into time that I spend with him and doing dinner etc, so I don't think he would be very happy with that either. What do I do? - runnersbeen
  • To be honest most of the dodgy people out there are tucked up in bed at 6am. Why not vary your route, times and days for a while? - Screamapillar
  • Don't think you'd necessarily be any more or less safe at 6pm than 6am.
  • I'd ensure my safely by carrying an alarm or leaving a note of my route and ETA (if possible) before I go out and run. There are nutters and bad people around everywhere to some extent, I think it's important that the rest of us don't become prisoners in our homes because of them. - Slugsta
  • Why not find a running partner? My housemate and fellow runner often goes out early before work but meets up with others to do so. They have quite a good running club at work. - Lyn S
  • Get a dog? - Farnie
  • Why should you have to ensure that your running doesn't interfere with everyone else? You have a right to a life too! Your husband and kids are big enough to look out for themselves occasionally, and surely your kids should be learning how to feed themselves? Anyway, I would think you'd be safe at 6.00am and 6.00pm, so you should choose which you prefer. - Wilkie
  • A woman was attacked near me recently, albeit at 3am on a Saturday night. 6am seems like a pretty safe time to me as is 7pm as long as you choose a busy well-lit route. I'm not letting the attack stop me from running, I'm just a bit more wary, and have decided to start back up with my running club. I actually went out the next day, but did avoid that particular part of the seafront, and didn't wear my iPod, I felt pretty safe. You can't let one unfortunate incident stop you from living your life. Just be sensible. - Pink
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For the week ending 21 Oct