RW’s Ultimate Half-Marathon schedules

The half-marathon is Britain’s most popular race distance, usually representing around 10 of the top 20 races in Runner’s World’s Races of the Year. The event requires a blend of stamina and speed endurance without the commitment needed for a marathon.

Targets

On each day, we list a suggested time, distance and pace that you should be running. (Speed sessions will have a total mileage and total time, which should include all repetitions and recoveries, and at least one mile as warm-up and cool-down.) We also list an intensity for each session, which reflects a combination of both pace and distance.

Every few weeks, there’s a key target, too. We explain these alongside each schedule. Your first week’s target, for example, is to run just inside goal half-marathon pace for 10K.

This may be difficult if you are below normal fitness when beginning the schedules, or easy if you are starting the schedules in good shape. Either way, progress steadily, and be realistic. If in doubt, it’s maybe best to start an easier schedule and move up as the weeks progress.

One note: if your target is a race, it’s worth planning well in advance, as many races sell out early. Visit our events calendar.

Schedules

We have six 12-week half-marathon schedules
  • Sub 1:20 (race pace: sub-6:06 per mile). Target times: 1:10 to 1:19. You should be capable of either a sub-36 10K, sub-60 10-miler or a sub-3:00 marathon. Training will be at least six days a week, with an average weekly mileage of 50 miles.
  • Sub-1:30 (race pace: sub-6:52 per mile). Target times: 1:20 to 1:29. You should be capable of either a sub-40 10K, sub-1:07 10-miler or a sub-3:15 marathon. Training will be six days a week, with an average weekly mileage of 40 miles.
  • Sub-1:45 (race pace: sub-8:00 per mile). Target times: from 1:30 to 1:44. You should be capable of either a sub-46 10K, sub-1:18 10-miler or a sub-4:00 marathon. Training will be at least five days a week, with an average weekly mileage of 35 miles.
  • Sub-2:00 (race pace: sub-9:09 per mile). Target times: 1:45 to 1:59. You should be capable of either a sub-60 10K, a sub-1:30 10-miler or a sub-5:00 marathon. Training will be four days a week, with an average weekly mileage of 25 miles.
  • Sub-2:15 (race pace: sub-10:18 per mile). Target times: 2:00 to 2:14. You should be capable of either a sub-1:05 10K, a sub-1:55 10-miler or a sub-6:00 marathon. Training will be three days a week, with an average weekly mileage of 15 miles.
  • Sub-2:30 (race pace: sub-11:26 per mile) Target times: 2:15 to 2:30. This is an ideal first-timer’s schedule, and combines running and walking. If you run already, you might be capable of either a sub-1:05 10K, a sub-1:55 10-miler or a sub-6:00 marathon. Training will be three days a week, with an average weekly mileage of 15 miles.
If you’re aiming for a time significantly quicker than our target times – eg 30 seconds a mile quicker – adjust all training speeds by a similar amount. Also... if you are training for a big event such as the Great North Run and want to achieve a target time by the clock rather from when you cross the line, you may need to train at a faster pace to allow for the time lost crossing the start (eg sub-2:00 runners may need to train for 1:55 pace and and sub-2:30 runners for 2:20 pace).