How do I get used to running off my bike in triathlons?

You can nail a 10K race and charge through speedwork, but performing at your best after putting in miles on the bike during a triathlon is a whole new skill. Pro triathlon coach Perry Agass, who works for renowned training organisation TriSutto and regularly coaches for ETE TriCamps, has shared his best tips for a successful bike-to-run transition.

5 bike-to-run transition tips

1/ Always remain focused when coming into T2 (Transition 2, the transition between the bike and run sections) - a lot can happen that could distract your progress.

2/ Spinning your legs out on low resistance just before you come into transition can be a good way to get the blood in the legs running.

3/ Once off the bike, calm everything down. My advice would be to ‘hurry slowly’ - rack your bike, put your trainers on, switch your number to the front of your kit, and then remove your helmet (making sure you put it down in the right place!). Then you're off.

4/ On all distances from 12 miles in a sprint triathlon to 112 miles in an Ironman, being on a bike then getting off to run isn’t something that’s natural. When you get off and start running, at first you’ll feel a little fatigued - hold form and just keep moving, and you’ll eventually run that feeling out and feel good.

5/ Once up and running, try to increase your speed gradually every 1 to 5K.

(Related: How should I train for my first Olympic-distance triathlon?)

Brick sessions

Building multiple brick sessions – cycling and running back-to-back - into your training is a very good way to build tolerance and strength for running off the bike. Perry recommends riding a circuit of around 6K to 12K (3.7-7.4 miles) for the bike, and 1K to 2K (0.62-1.24 miles) for the run – make it short, fast and hard. He adds you can also ride longer if you wish - try two hours going hard on the bike, then either jump off and run some short fast reps, or do a longer run for 5K to 15K (3.1 to 9.3 miles).